@tal@kbin.social avatar

tal

@tal@kbin.social

Trying a switch to tal@lemmy.today, at least for a while, due to recent kbin.social stability problems and to help spread load.

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tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

VS Code is going to require a newer version of glibc than Ubuntu 18.04 comes with. One does not simply upgrade glibc.

One might have a an application-private newer build of glibc and set LD_LIBRARY_PATH to the directory containing it prior to launching VS Code.

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

If she's the only alternative in the primary race and he has a heart attack or something, I would assume that she winds up becoming the Republican nominee.

Ending support for Windows 10 could send 240 million computers to the landfill. Why not install Linux on them? (gadgettendency.com)

With support ending for Windows 10, the most popular desktop operating system in the world currently, possibly 240 million pcs may be sent to the landfill. This is mostly due to Windows 11’s exorbitant requirements. This will most likely result in many pcs being immediately outdated, and prone to viruses. GNU/Linux may be...

tal , (edited )
@tal@kbin.social avatar

It depends on the definition of "support ended". Like, there are various forms of extended support that you can pay for for versions of Windows, and some companies do.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_XP#Support_lifecycle

Support for the original release of Windows XP (without a service pack) ended on August 30, 2005.[4] Both Windows XP Service Pack 1 and 1a were retired on October 10, 2006,[4] and both Windows 2000 and Windows XP SP2 reached their end of support on July 13, 2010, about 24 months after the launch of Windows XP Service Pack 3.[4] The company stopped general licensing of Windows XP to OEMs and terminated retail sales of the operating system on June 30, 2008, 17 months after the release of Windows Vista.[114] However, an exception was announced on April 3, 2008, for OEMs producing what it defined as "ultra low-cost personal computers", particularly netbooks, until one year after the availability of Windows 7 on October 22, 2009. Analysts felt that the move was primarily intended to compete against Linux-based netbooks, although Microsoft's Kevin Hutz stated that the decision was due to apparent market demand for low-end computers with Windows.[115]

So for those, we're all definitely a decade past the end of normal support. However, they have their extended support packages that can be purchased, and we aren't a decade past the end of those...but most users probably aren't actually getting those:

On April 14, 2009, Windows XP exited mainstream support and entered the extended support phase; Microsoft continued to provide security updates every month for Windows XP, however, free technical support, warranty claims, and design changes were no longer being offered. Extended support ended on April 8, 2014, over 12 years after the release of Windows XP; normally Microsoft products have a support life cycle of only 10 years.[118] Beyond the final security updates released on April 8, no more security patches or support information are provided for XP free-of-charge; "critical patches" will still be created, and made available only to customers subscribing to a paid "Custom Support" plan.[119] As it is a Windows component, all versions of Internet Explorer for Windows XP also became unsupported.[120]

In January 2014, it was estimated that more than 95% of the 3 million automated teller machines in the world were still running Windows XP (which largely replaced IBM's OS/2 as the predominant operating system on ATMs); ATMs have an average lifecycle of between seven and ten years, but some have had lifecycles as long as 15. Plans were being made by several ATM vendors and their customers to migrate to Windows 7-based systems over the course of 2014, while vendors have also considered the possibility of using Linux-based platforms in the future to give them more flexibility for support lifecycles, and the ATM Industry Association (ATMIA) has since endorsed Windows 10 as a further replacement.[121] However, ATMs typically run the embedded variant of Windows XP, which was supported through January 2016.[122] As of May 2017, around 60% of the 220,000 ATMs in India still run Windows XP.[123]

Furthermore, at least 49% of all computers in China still ran XP at the beginning of 2014. These holdouts were influenced by several factors; prices of genuine copies of later versions of Windows in the country are high, while Ni Guangnan of the Chinese Academy of Sciences warned that Windows 8 could allegedly expose users to surveillance by the United States government,[124] and the Chinese government banned the purchase of Windows 8 products for government use in May 2014 in protest of Microsoft's inability to provide "guaranteed" support.[125] The government also had concerns that the impending end of support could affect their anti-piracy initiatives with Microsoft, as users would simply pirate newer versions rather than purchasing them legally. As such, government officials formally requested that Microsoft extend the support period for XP for these reasons. While Microsoft did not comply with their requests, a number of major Chinese software developers, such as Lenovo, Kingsoft and Tencent, will provide free support and resources for Chinese users migrating from XP.[126] Several governments, in particular those of the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, elected to negotiate "Custom Support" plans with Microsoft for their continued, internal use of Windows XP; the British government's deal lasted for a year, and also covered support for Office 2003 (which reached end-of-life the same day) and cost £5.5 million.[127]

For the typical, individual end user, one probably wants to have been off Windows XP by 2008.

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

Text-based-games and MUDs are not the same thing. There's a considerable library of text-based interactive fiction out there.

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

£

Ugh, didn't think of that interpretation.

Pound sign, as in "#".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_sign

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

No, though it could be the first character in a hashtag. A hashtag includes the characters that follow.

EDIT: The article I linked to says that in Canada, it's typically called the "number sign", in the US, the "pound sign", and in the UK, the "hash mark".

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

I use these tools.

That being said, I think that a lot of the value of knowing them comes specifically from their ability to let one cobble together things to automate the broader Unix environment, for which they are invaluable.

If one's goal is specifically exploratory data analysis, I think that one probably gets more bang-for-the-buck in learning GNU R or something like that.

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

Ehh....Not really a mechanism for that that I can see. I mean, say that there's demand for that, which I can believe. Do I go to a given distro and buy a "security hardened" version? I don't see how that would work. Is the distro going to refrain from incorporating security fixes into the "non-hardened" free version?

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

Well, you've got Ardour. But I suspect that there are people who do want this software package.

tal ,
@tal@kbin.social avatar

I don't know, the camera formatted them, but I highly doubt that it is NTFS. So propably exFAT...

If you have the filesystem mounted, I believe you can see in /proc/mounts.

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  • tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    republic candidate

    Republican candidate

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    The Steam store does have a section for non-game software. It's not very heavily-populated, but it's there.

    https://store.steampowered.com/search/?category1=994&supportedlang=english&ndl=1

    1,439 results match your search.

    If I exclude non-Linux-native stuff (which will still generally run via Proton):

    https://store.steampowered.com/search/?category1=994&os=linux&supportedlang=english&ndl=1

    100 results match your search.

    And because it has a standard set of libraries, it's probably the closest thing to a stable, cross-Linux-distro binary target out there, which I suspect most closed-source software would just as soon have.

    You run your open-source stuff on the host distro, and run the Steam stuff targeting the Steam libraries.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Well, whoever does that for closed-source software is going to basically have to do what they have done. Probably some kind of cross-distro fixed binary target, client software to do updates, probably some level of DRM functionality like steamlib integration.

    If it's not Steam, it's gonna be something that has a lot of the same characteristics.

    Personally, I kind of wish that there was better sandboxing for apps from Steam (think what the mobile crowd has) since I'd rather not trust each one with the ability to muck up my system, but given how many improvements Valve's driven so far, I don't feel like I can complain at them for that. A lot of the software they sell is actually designed for Windows, which isn't sandboxed, and given the fact that not all the infrastructure is in place (like, you'd need Wayland, I dunno how much I'd trust 3d drivers to be hardened, you maybe have to do firejail-style restrictions on filesystem and network access, and I have no idea how hardened WINE is), it'd still take real work.

    Their use of per-app WINE prefixes helps keep apps that play nicely from messing each other up, but it isn't gonna keep a malicious mod on Steam Workshop or something from compromising your system.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    the Pixels are actually worth it and very very good phones.

    Not the longest-battery-life devices.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Valve was fined €1.6 million ($1.7 million) for obstructing the sale of certain PC video games outside Europe. However, the company pleaded not guilty.

    Wait, outside Europe?

    Some countries make it illegal to buy certain video games. If Valve can't geoblock sale of them outside Europe, how are they supposed to conform with both sets of laws?

    I remember that the EU didn't want country-specific pricing inside the EU, and had some case over that. That I get, because I can see the EU having an interest in not wanting it creating problems for mobility around the EU. But I hadn't heard about the EU going after vendors for not selling things outside Europe.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    But retail law attaches to a location, not to citizenship. Why would the EU be mandating sale of things in other regions? I mean, it's not like the US says "if an American citizen is living in the EU, then vendors operating in the EU must follow American retail law when selling to him".

    EDIT: Okay, I went looking for another article.

    https://www.gearrice.com/update/steam-cannot-block-the-activation-of-a-game-depending-on-the-country-of-purchase-europe-confirms/

    Steam specifies in its terms of use that it is prohibited to use a VPN or equivalent to change your location on the platform. Except that it takes the case of the activation of a game given to you by someone and sent to your account. Following Europe’s decision, this should technically change and it would be possible to change region in Steam directly to buy a game then activate it in France. Valve has not made a comment at this time.

    Hmm. Okay, if that is an accurate summary -- and I am not sure that it is -- that seems like the EU is saying "you must be able to use a VPN to buy something anywhere in the world, then activate it in Europe". Yeah, I can definitely see Valve objecting to that, because that'd kill their ability to have one price in the (wealthy) EU and one in (poor) Eritrea, say. Someone in France would just VPN to Eritrea, buy at Eritrean prices, and then use it in France. The ability to have region-specific pricing is significant for digital goods, where almost all the costs are the fixed development costs.

    thinks

    If that is an accurate representation of the situation, that seems like it'd be pretty problematic for not just Valve, but also other digital vendors, since it'd basically force EU prices to be the same as the lowest prices that they could sell a digital product at in the world. I don't know how one would deal with that. I guess that they could make an EU-based company ("Valve Germany") or something that sells in the EU, and have a separate company that does international sales and does not sell in the EU.

    I mean, otherwise a vendor is either going to not be able to offer something in Eritrea (using it as a stand-in for random poor countries), is going to have to sell it at a price that is going to be completely unaffordable to Eritreans, or is going to have to take a huge hit on pricing in the EU.

    I'm a little suspicious that this isn't a complete summary of the situation, though; that seems like it'd create too many issues.

    EDIT2: Though looking at my linked-to article, it seems to be that the author is saying that that's exactly what the situation is.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    The EU is preventing price discrimination within the EU.

    They do have that requirement as part of the Digital Markets Act, but I don't believe that that's what the case here is addressing. That is not what the article OP posted or the article I linked to is saying: they are specifically saying that what is at issue is sales outside Europe.

    EDIT: I am thinking that maybe the article is just in error. I mean, just from an economic standpoint, the EU doing this would create a major mess for international companies.

    EDIT2: Okay, here's an archive.ph link of the original Bloomberg article:

    https://archive.ph/JuM0z#selection-4849.212-4863.277

    In the contested arrangement with Valve, users were left unable to access some games that were available in other EU nations.

    Yeah, so it's just that these "mezha.media" guys mis-summarized the Bloomberg article.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    They may not want their configuration stored in $HOME, for example:

    they’re on a machine that isn’t under their physical control and ~/.config is mounted over the network from their personal machine;

    That sounds like it's a bad way to handle configuration, since among many other problems, it won't work with the many programs that do have dotfiles in home directory, but even if that happened, you could just symlink it.

    they prefer to version control their configuration files using git, with a configuration directory managed over different branches;

    I do that. I symlink that config into a git-controlled directory. If OP plans to put his entire ~/.config in git, he is doing things wrong, because some of that needs to be machine-local.

    the user simply wants to have a clean and consistent $HOME directory and filesystem

    If whatever program you are using to view your home directory cannot hide those files, it is broken, as it does not work with a whole lot of existing software.

    less secure,

    If your home directory is "not secure", you're probably in trouble already.

    Like, there are reasons you may not want to put dotfiles in a homedir, but none of the arguments in the article are them.

    EDIT: I will ask developers to stop dumping directories and files that don't start with a dot in people's home directories, though. I gave up over twenty years ago and put my actual stuff under ~/m just to keep it from being polluted with all the other things that dump non-dotfiles/-dotdirs in a home directory. Looking at my current system, I have:

    • A number of directories containing video game saves and configuration. I am pretty sure that these are mostly bad Windows ports or possibly Windows programs under WINE that just dump stuff into a user's home directory there (not even good on Windows). Some are Windows Steam games.
    • WINE apparently has decided that it's a good idea to default to sticking the Windows home directory and all of its directories in there.
    • Apparently some webcam software that I used at one point.
    • A few logfiles
    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Yeah, I think I tried it and it didn't do something I wanted and so used a homebrew script for the same thing, but it or a similar package or script is definitely what I'd recommend.

    That should work with dotfiles in .config, in the home directory, any other config you want to be portable across machines, etc.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I mean, if you have USB, for a non-mobile platform, it doesn't really matter. It's not hard to get a USB audio interface.

    For cell phones or laptops, I can understand not wanting another thing to plug in, but for something like a Raspberry Pi...shrugs

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    we’re going to ringfence all of the Raspberry Pi 5s we sell until at least the end of the year for single-unit sales to individuals, so you get the first bite of the cherry.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Hmm. Yeah, though I have to say that the USB route looks cheaper.

    https://thepihut.com/collections/raspberry-pi-audio-hats

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=usb+audio+adapter

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Why would you expect USB to constrain your audio quality?

    You're not getting better 0s or 1s based on which bus they're sent over to the DAC.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I use kbin rather then lemmy, and the kbin API isn't complete, but looks like there's lemmy support in:

    https://codeberg.org/martianh/lem.el

    15 Underrated Indie Games (youtu.be)

    The AAA gaming space can often lack innovation, so people usually turn to small indie studios for something fresh. Whether it’s for unique gameplay design, beautiful aesthetics or satisfying combat, these 15 overlooked indie games stood out to me. This is my top 15 list of underrated, hidden indie gems for PC that I enjoy more...

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I think that that's a sheep.

    EDIT: The top comment on YouTube says "goat mommy is Crimson Acid from Paradise Killer".

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Valve’s “fake Windows Linux device that just runs Windows games without paying Microsoft money – how is this not a violation of Windows TOS”

    Valve uses a build of WINE called Proton, not Windows. Microsoft's TOS terms apply to Windows. They don't have anything to do with software that's simply able to run the same binaries.

    EDIT: Ah, I looked at your comment history, and it appears to just be trolling, so I assume that this wasn't a serious question.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    https://moneyinc.com/linus-torvalds-net-worth/

    How Linus Torvalds Achieved a Net Worth of $150 Million

    Red Hat and VA Linux went public, and since they acknowledged it would not have been possible without the programmer, Torvalds received shares reportedly worth $20 million. Before it went public, Red Hat had allegedly paid Torvalds $1 million in stock, which the programmer claims was the only big payout he received.

    He revealed that the rest of the stock Transmeta and another Linux startup awarded him were not worth much by the time he could sell them. However, in the case of his Red Hat stock, it must have been worth his while because, in 2012, Red Hat became the first $1 billion open-source company when it reached the billion-dollar mark in annual revenue.

    Whether he exercised his stock options is unclear, but the money he makes from the gains could be the reason why his net worth has continued to soar.

    Well, that's one definition of being communist, I suppose. Myself, I think that it's fairly safe to say that Torvalds is okay with private ownership of industry.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    now a full-blown woke communist (like Linus Torvalds)

    OP's words.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Only the last five are terminal shortcuts (for some terminal emulator, which the author doesn't specify).

    Most of first ones are specifically emacs-like shortcuts used by readline() as bash uses it. You can also set it up to use vi-like shortcuts (I mean, I use emacs, but just pointing out that they're there).

    The bang-history stuff with the exclamation points is also a bash feature.

    If you use a shell other than bash, or if you aren't in the shell, those won't necessarily apply (unless a given application is also using readline() with emacs-like keybindings).

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I'm assuming that you're not a native speaker, as I've seen many people in a Europe subreddit have difficulty with US headlines having different grammatical rules from non-headline text. They complained about them being not understandable; it's apparently not something that English classes cover.

    Said forum also had people complain about title case use in headlines (the norm in American English, though not British English) and use of some words like "slams" that are a common convention in headlines.

    EDIT: Here's a British English source listing some of the other grammatical rule differences for headlines.

    I'm kind of surprised that nobody's done a Wikipedia page on headline grammar rules (or at least hadn't last time I looked, for people on that Europe forum), or I'd link there. It seems to me to be a common-enough issue that someone would have summarized them there, but apparently not.

    EDIT2: It was a grammar difference that I wasn't even aware of until I saw it brought up there. I mean, if you'd asked me, I could have told you prior to that that headlines looked different, could have written text that "looked like a headline", but you learn grammar differently when learning a language as a native speaker -- you use articles and conjunctions and such before you've learned what they are, so you don't think about grammar the same way. As a second language, you already have parts of speech and grammatical rules under your belt, so the mental representation is different.

    When I first ran into this, there was some guy, who I think was maybe German, insisting that a headline was incorrectly-written. I took a look and was equally insistent that it was not incorrectly written. He hadn't specified was was wrong about it, because to him it was so obvious that it was wrong, and to me it was so normal that it wasn't wrong and I couldn't even guess what he was talking about, so it took a couple rounds of back-and-forth before we even understood what the other was talking about. My English classes had never covered headline grammar (people in the US had been probably reading headlines for a long time before they were taught grammar in a school), and it sounds like his hadn't either, so neither of us had been consciously aware of the existence of a different set of grammar for headlines. But he was sort of doing the mental grammar diagramming that I would for Spanish, which I know as a second language, but don't do for English. The headline didn't diagram out at all using normal English grammar rules.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Well, there aren't paper costs, but now there are smartphone screens.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Some other quirks I ran into -- native speakers who don't read much often confuse "their", "they're", and "there", because they're homophones. They learn the language as speakers years before they learn to write or cover grammar, and in that environment, it's easy to mentally treat the words as one. The people on that Europe forum virtually never did that.

    But one error that did come up -- in languages in Europe, there is often a "Romance" word and a "Germanic" word and they translate directly into each other when you move across languages, whereas in English, sometimes both of the words exist as loanwords and have different meanings. Examples are "manikin" and "mannequin" or "block" and "bloc". I especially saw "block" get used to refer to a political group, whereas normally in English, you'd use "bloc" for that.

    One that I'd been aware of for a while that Russians have trouble with is use of the definite and indefinite article. So, in English, you have the definite and indefinite article, "the" and "a". In English, you are required by the language to always indicate whether a thing is a specific thing or an example of a type. I didn't realize until listening to a series of linguistic lectures that that's actually an unusual property for a language to have -- English does that, but most languages do not. In English, you must have "the cat" or "a cat"; you can't just say "cat drank milk". But it was so embedded into my thought process that I hadn't realized that I just always do that. Russian, as well as most languages out there, doesn't work like that.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    It is possible to get a USB power station. The Deck can charge at up to 45W.

    I wish that power stations acted more like "external batteries" (would automtically be flipped on by devices when their internal batteries get low, will be charged after their internal batteries are charged), but even as things are, they do let one extend battery life on portable devices dramatically.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    The rest of the world doesn’t use SMS/RCS/iMessage as much as WhatsApp and the like

    SMSes use a standard available to any app. WhatsApp is controlled by a single company.

    If you were arguing that XMPP or something like that should be used instead of SMS, okay, that's one thing, but I have a hard time favoring a walled garden.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Open source community have their own chat system since 2014 (Matrix).

    I think that IRC is kind of the original open chat system.

    EDIT:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Relay_Chat

    IRC was created by Jarkko Oikarinen in August 1988 to replace a program called MUT (MultiUser Talk) on a BBS called OuluBox at the University of Oulu in Finland, where he was working at the Department of Information Processing Science. Jarkko intended to extend the BBS software he administered, to allow news in the Usenet style, real time discussions and similar BBS features.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    It sounds like the issue the regulator had was something specific to cloud game streaming, and Microsoft addressed that.

    The CMA had originally blocked the acquisition over cloud gaming concerns, but Microsoft recently restructured the deal to transfer cloud gaming rights for current and new Activision Blizzard games to Ubisoft.

    How likely is this to work? KVM/VFIO Single GPU Passthrough (www.youtube.com)

    I’ve been wanting to make a proper switch over to Linux for a while now. I’ve currently have a dual-boot setup but still mostly use Windows. The majority of my games should work without fuss, but I’d like to have a simple solution for running the handful of things that don’t work in Linux, such as my WMR VR headset and a...

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I don't know if you can do it in software with passthrough, as the guest controls the hardware and would need to coordinate things.

    Using a KVM would be a hardware solution that would permit for one monitor, though.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Ah, I gotcha. One keyboard/mouse, VM guest output in a window on the host would be ideal.

    Run a VNC or RDP server on the guest VM, connect with a client on the host? That won't have quite the performance -- if you're debugging a 3d game and playing it as part of it, you'll get latency, so that won't be a good solution for OP -- but that may not matter for your use case.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    The Steam Deck is more expensive.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Microsoft-SVP-00001-Xbox-Series-S-Game-Console-512-GB-SSD-AMD-Zen-2-3-6-GHz-10-GDDR6-SDRAM-RDNA-HDMI-1440p-Controller-HDR-Capable-DTS-Dolby-Atmos-Sea/1861650659?from=/search

    Series S: $274.95

    https://store.steampowered.com/steamdeck

    Steam Deck: $359.10

    And that's for the low-end Steam Deck. The nicest one is $519.20, almost twice what the Series S runs.

    tal , (edited )
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I mean, I would rather have a Steam Deck too, but then we're getting into how much people value openness versus price, and that's definitely not a constant; some people aren't going to care much about openness.

    That said, if I were trying to compare Valve's offering and Microsoft's offering, I'd probably compare a desktop PC running Steam to the XBox, as they're more-physically-comparable in terms of what they can do; the Series S doesn't have one having to pay for mobility. If one were comparing to a mobile console, then sure, the Deck is a legit comparison.

    I still would say that the XBox Series S is going to be cheaper on the low end, though, than a desktop PC. You can get a $279 PC that can play games and a comparable controller, but I'd bet that it'd be more-limited than a Series S.

    That being said, Microsoft sells the XBox at a loss, and then makes it back by jacking up the price of games:

    https://www.pcmag.com/news/microsoft-says-xbox-consoles-have-always-been-sold-at-a-loss

    As VGC points out, Wright was also asked if there's ever been a profit generated from an Xbox console sale, which she confirmed has never happened. To put that in context, Microsoft has been selling Xbox consoles for nearly 20 years now, including the original Xbox, the Xbox 360, Xbox One, and now the Xbox Series X and Series S. In all that time, every single console sale cost Microsoft money.

    The reason game consoles end up being profitable is through a combination of software, service, and accessory sales, but it's still surprising to find Microsoft has never achieved hardware profitability. Analyst Daniel Ahmad confirmed that the PS4 eventually became profitable for Sony and that Nintendo developed the Switch to be profitable quickly, so Microsoft is the odd one out.

    We know that consumers weight the up-front price of hardware disproportionately -- that's why you have companies selling cell phones at a loss, locking them to their network, and then making the money back in increased subscription fees. I assume that that's to try to take advantage of that phenomenon.

    If you wanted to compare the full price that you pay over the lifetime of the console, one would probably need to account for the increased game price on consoles and how many games someone would buy.

    Now, all that being said, I don't have a Series S or a Series X, and I'm not arguing that someone should buy them. I have a Linux PC for gaming precisely because I do value openness, so in terms of which system I'd rather have, you're preaching to the choir. I'm just saying that I don't think that I'd agree with the above statement that the Deck is as cheap as the Series S.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I'm a little fuzzy as to why the first-sale doctrine exists for physical goods but not for digital goods. It seems to me that any reasonable economic rationale should affect either both or neither.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    modular thumbsticks

    Hmm.

    So is this modular thumbsticks akin to the Microsoft Elite controller, where you can put taller or shorter stems on or different tops?

    Or is it like the Thrustmaster eSwap Pro, where you can remove the entire mechanism beneath, and put something else in (like, say, a more-expensive-but-immune-to-drift Hall Effect thumbstick)?

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    What is Microsoft even making money on these days?

    googles

    https://www.kamilfranek.com/microsoft-revenue-breakdown/

    Azure, Office, and (still) Windows, apparently.

    Only 8% of revenue is gaming. They sure do went to grow that.

    Microsoft documents leak new Bethesda games, including an Oblivion remaster (www.theverge.com)

    Remember that these were estimates from more than three years ago and before Microsoft completed its acquisition of ZeniMax in March 2021, so there’s always the chance that some of these plans have changed dramatically or been scrapped entirely. But they may provide an early look at some of the games we can look forward to...

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    The Fallout 3 remaster (fiscal year 2024)

    If you consider that A Tale of Two Wastelands -- where people forward-ported the Fallout 3 world to the Fallout: New Vegas engine and ruleset -- was successful, that could be pretty solid. I still think I'd forward-port Fallout: New Vegas to the current Bethesda engine before I'd forward-port Fallout 3, though. Fallout: New Vegas was a better game.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallout:_New_Vegas#Tale_of_Two_Wastelands

    Tale of Two Wastelands

    Tale of Two Wastelands is a total conversion mod for Fallout: New Vegas that merges the entire content of Fallout 3 and its DLC and New Vegas into one game. The mod implements features introduced in New Vegas into Fallout 3, such as the Companion Wheel, crafting recipes, and weapon mods. Players can freely traverse between the two games on a single save file, keeping all of their items and their progression between game worlds.[76][77][78][79]

    Also, most Fallout: New Vegas mods worked with Tale of Two Wastelands, which was pretty cool.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    Heh. Porting Skywind to an Oblivion remaster might make sense.

    It'd be interesting to see Tamriel Rebuilt ported to Skywind ported to this Oblivion remaster.

    Need some kind of automated migration tools to help.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    It's not as critical for Bethesda's series, because the stories don't intertwine, but one good reason to update some series is that the games span a really long period of time, to the point where only players who grew up with the series will have played the whole thing. Otherwise, players can only play the later games in a series.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    I loved my Dualsense too, and then the left stick started drifting so badly, it’s completely unusable now. It’s only about a year old, too

    I really think that something changed with a major potentiometer manufacturer in the past few years. I don't recall stick drift on a PS2 controller that I used for many years, but I've seen it on a number of controllers from different vendors recently.

    Only thing I can think of other than recent hardware problems is that maybe the controller hardware imposed a certain amount of deadzone at one point in time and stopped doing so in newer gamepads, and that masked the drift.

    tal ,
    @tal@kbin.social avatar

    A bunch of controllers have extremely obnoxious security bits required. I had to get two separate bit sets to open a bunch of controllers.

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