@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

r00ty

@r00ty@kbin.life

I'm the administrator of kbin.life, a general purpose/tech orientated kbin instance.

This profile is from a federated server and may be incomplete. Browse more on the original instance.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I think ultimately this is going to become the crunch point. Because what kind of jobs can AI eventually take over (with appropriate robotics) in the mid-term future?

  • Driving (if all cars were computer controlled today and roads were segregated from pedestrians, it'd probably already be possible)
  • Likely end to end delivery could be automated. Large amounts of the process already are
  • Train (and bus based on item 1) drivers. Currently, much of the urban transit systems around the world are ATO, where the train controller opens/closes doors and starts the train and is primarily present for safety. The rest is done automatically. There are already fully automated transits, and I suspect it is unions and legitimate safety concerns stopping full automation. But, it could be done with some work I think.
  • Software development. I mean, currently the AI prediction in Visual Studio is sometimes scarily good. It DOES need to be guided by someone that can recognise when it gets it wrong. But so often development of a function now is writing 2 lines and auto completing half of the rest of the lines from the "AI". It's really a task of improving LLM and tying in LLM to product specific knowledge. Our days are most certainly numbered I think.
  • Software design. This is similar to the above. With a good LLM (or General AI) loaded with good product knowledge, you might only need a few people to maintain/rework requirements into a format they can work with and feed-back mistakes until they get a sensible result. Each time reducing the likelihood that mistake will happen again. We'll need less for sure.
  • I think a lot of the more basic functions of a nurse might well become tasks for some form of robotic AI companion for fully trained nurses/doctors. Maybe this is a bit further away
  • Airline pilots could probably already be replaced, and it's purely on the safety grounds that I'm glad they're not. Generally once a route is programmed the pilots on a flight that goes well, will drive the plane to the runway, the plane will automatically set thrust for economic take-off. Once established in the air autopilot will pretty much take them to their destination. Pilots can then switch modes, and the autopilot for an equipped airport can take the plane to a safe landing. Although in practice, pilots usually take control back around 500 feet from the ground, I think. It's not really many steps that need automating. I feel like, at least one pilot will be retained for safety reasons. For the reasons for certain high profile incidents, there's an argument to keep 2 forever. But, in terms of could they be replaced? Yes, totally.
  • Salespersons. Honestly, the way algorithms trick people into buying things they don't need. I'd argue they've already been replaced and businesses just still employ real sales people because they feel they need to :P
  • Cleaners (domestic and street/commercial) could potentially be replaced by robotic versions. At the very least, the number of real people needed could be drastically reduced to supervisors of a robotic team.
  • Retail workers. There's already the automated McDonald's isn't there? I also think the fact commercial property in large cities is becoming less occupied is a sign that as a whole, we're moving away from high-street retail and more online or specialist. As such, while we'll always probably need some real people here, the numbers will be much lower.

Now, when it comes to industrial and farm work. There's a LOT that is already semi-automated. One person can do the job with tech that might have taken 10 or more now. I can see this improving and if we ever pull of a more generalised AI approach, more entire roles could be eliminated.

My main point is, we're already at the point where the number of jobs that need people are considerably less than they used to be, this trend will continue. We know we cannot trust the free market and business in general to be ethical about this. So we should expect a large surplus of people with no real chance of gainful employment.

How we deal with that is important. Do we keep capitalism and go with a UBI and allow people to pursue their passions to top that up? Do we have some kind of inverse lottery for the jobs that do need doing? Where people perhaps take a 3 month block of 3 day working weeks to fill some of the positions that are needed? I'm not sure. I suspect we're going to go through at least a short period of "dark age" where the rich get MUCH richer, and everyone else gets screwed over before something is done about the problem.

Looks to me like Gates is looking ahead at this.

Sorry if that wall of text sounds pessimistic. Just one way I can see things going.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I don't really see organisations as unethical. They usually don't act ethically, but that's not because as a whole they're unethical.

I see them more like insects. They generally react to stimuli and just do the same as the other insects/organisations, things that have been proven to work. They're also generally driven by one basic instinct, to make more money, and they do it at any cost. The drones (employees) are entirely disposable in this endeavour and if they can entirely remove them from the equation they will do it in a heartbeat.

Even those that perhaps do have some form of ethical streak and don't think they should dump all their employees for AI/robots? Well, good for them, but they'll be driven out of business by those that do.

When you think of a business or other organisation in this way, a lot of the weird things they do start to make a lot of sense.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I think it varies by industry/job position. It was a number out of thin air though, I'll admit.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

My point is, you don't see insects as ethical or unethical. I see organisations the same way. They're acting on instinct, and are just aiming to do what they exist for. Make money. Ethics don't even come into it. Now, peering outside in, you can try to cast society's ethical views on organisations. But, they generally don't even consider them (until they are forced to by local legislation, or that the route to making more money, or indeed not less money is to be seen to be ethical).

This is why there's more often than not a certain kind of person drawn to leadership positions.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Nope. I think you're not really understanding what I'm trying to say. I'm saying that ethics do not factor into an organisation's decisions in the same way it doesn't for a colony of insects. They are ethically neutral in that respect.

At the same time, if you apply ethics looking from the outside in, of course you will cast their actions as ethical and unethical and many of their actions will be unethical.

I'm actually saying this is a bad thing, but is just a property of how an organisation, and especially successful businesses, operate. We're not going to change that, I suspect. As such we should expect businesses to exploit AI to the fullest ability, even knowing that removing most or all of their employees is bad for the employee, bad for the country (and the world), bad for the economy and ultimately in the future, bad for the business/organisation too. But they simply do not look that far ahead.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I started with LinuxFT from a magazine coverdisk. I also installed it on an old 486 at the office. It became the "internet box". The company director at the time believed Bill Gates that the internet would be a fad and wasn't worth investing in and would not put any money into the company internet connection. So, it was an old 486, running LinuxFT, with a modem calling out on demand, squid proxy, email boxes etc. But it worked.

After that I moved to Redhat (before it was paid for). I remember for sure installing RH5. It was definitely a smoother experience.

Server wise, I went through various distros. Once I got to debian, for servers I never really left the "apt" world. Management wise, it's just too easy to work with. Hopping between Ubuntu and Debian even now.

For firewalls I've been through ipfwadm (Kernel 2.0.x), ipchains (Kernel 2.2.x) and iptables (Kernel 2.4.x). Now, there is some newer stuff now. Nftables, but there hasn't been a "you must change" situation like the other two and as such, I've generally stuck with iptables, mainly because when I did try nftables I had a real problem getting it to play nice with qos. Probably all fixed now, but I'm too lazy to change.

Desktop wise. I dual boot windows/linux. Linux is Manjaro, and I like Manjaro, for the fact that gaming generally just worked. However, I feel like every major upgrade I am chasing broken dependencies for far too long. But, when it works, Manjaro is great. However, I have had several failed desktop experiments. I ran Gentoo way way way back, I think I had an AMD Athlon at the time. I thought it was great, I mean building stuff for my specific setup, nice idea and all. But upgrades were so damn slow compiling everything! I tried Ubuntu, but I never found the desktop to be any good. I did also have Redhat way back in the late 90s. But the desktop was just poor back then.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

The UK driving licence has birthdate as YMMDDY in the licence number. Totally uncrackable encryption.

r00ty , (edited )
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

How about 0xYYYMDD or 0xYYYYMDD if you need years after 4095 for some reason.

Today is 0x7e7b16

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Nah. With binary, you can lose one hex digit AND the max year would be 2047 (11 bits year, 4 bits month, 5 bits day). What's not to like about hex anyway?

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Yes, although isn't that an urban legend? Pretty sure I read that it was.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

What I read was that it never happened in the old versions and it wasn't a bug in civ5, in that, it was a nod to the legend. But apparently Sid Meier said it didn't happen in the original games.

EDIT: Here you go https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_Gandhi

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

People often don't help themselves either. I remember this time, I was driving on a country road in the fog. Suddenly I saw my foglights light up a dog walking in the road. So I drove around, then as I got closer I saw a man walking this dog, dressed all in black, on an unlit country road, walking away from traffic, in dense fog.

If he made it back home alive, it's purely down to luck (or his dog being seen before him again).

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I think a lot of people knew Musk was full of it from the start. His recent twitter antics have just brought the realisation to a larger crowd.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Yeah, I was about to say when I read the first part. Adding windows manually is quite an old thing. Modern linux setups with grub2 will "find" the EFI loader for windows and add it automatically.

I lost my grub loader when I upgraded hardware recently. But, I just booted into a linux USB, chroot (remembering to mount /boot/efi) and re-run grub install/grub update. That didn't find windows. But, it was fine because I just properly booted into linux and ran grub-update again there, and it found it fine.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Hmm, only bios/firmware updates are meant to do that. Some hardware changes will too. I mean, it's what it's there for.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Ah, the good old days of network troubleshooting. Wiggle the cable at the BNC connector until the whole segment comes back to life. Those huge repeater boxes with like 8 ports. Somehow 10Mbit to a Netware server being faster than a local hard drive. Smartdrv fixed most of that though.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I think this is ultimately the answer. I'm not going to judge wayland until I see it as ready and can truly replace X in all use cases.

I sometimes feel like the distros switching now is premature. But, maybe they know something I don't.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Didn't we already do this with the Windows XP "N" edition?

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Didn't they change to torx and change the base they screw into metal?

The former is a mild annoyance, but they're a pretty standard bit now that anyone that does any electronic DIY has in their set. The latter is a huge improvement.

Must admit I didn't look too much into it though
but mostly seems positive.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Aha, OK. That's my bad. When I read it on the phone earlier, I read the four point list as something you thought they should be doing, and not what they were doing. As such, I thought you were ranting against them.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

NO SOLICITING!

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I'm from the UK and part of the forgotten generation, so I was pretty much brought up on both systems. The "cheaper" way to do F from C is double it and add thirty. It works reasonable enough. Of course the reverse is minus thirty then half.

I'm definitely more native in deg C, but am fine with deg F too. Yes, I added deg to stop the coding jokes.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Judge r00ty has ruled that it's fine for you to do this.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

My experience of 144hz is that in terms of seeing a difference, it's not much. I mostly see it when looking around a scene and the movement is more fluid. However, what you can notice isn't as much as what makes a difference in games.

I tried the dust2 awp test map on 60hz and 144hz. The difference with how many I could hit with 144hz was not down to chance and was quite repeatable. I think (and it's just a layman theorizing here) that unconsciously our muscle memory, or hand/eye co-ordination are working on cues beyond what we consciously see. And this is why it helps for split second game decisions like this.

My opinion is, if you cannot see the difference consciously and you don't play FPS then maybe you should de-prioritize refresh rates over other monitor features. There's nothing wrong with that.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Microsoft: Not enough people are using our snazzy AI we spent a lot of time and money developing. Whatever should we do?
Also Microsoft: Force the users to use it!

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Not to mention how they're delivering the high voltage to the plugs and how a tiny spark will melt snow. Glow plugs might stand a slightly better chance. Slightly.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Huh, who knew they had their legal reps on the fediverse.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

We're already here!

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

It's a kbin/lemmy integration thing. Although I did think it was fixed now.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Yeah, sorry. I can't give you any lottery numbers just in time to buy a ticket.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Well, see you win one lottery, to get the seed money. Then you suddenly become a really good futures trader overnight with the winnings.

EDIT: Which is kinda what you said I now realise.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Data, with the emotion chip would have used Comic Sans.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I'm not even worried about hacking. I'd be more concerned about the "legitimate" mandatory advertising direct to your brain!

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

You can do that? I mean, actually yeah I do feel like a large big mac meal right now.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Nah, it's a full on J turn and then floor it!

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

It's all well and good until you wake up, and you're in Epping!

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I did it on the circle line once. Woke up at Hammersmith. Luckily though I was going to Paddington, so it wasn't the worst trip back. Epping, on the other hand...

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

So, currently when you visit a https secured website the initial request to the server is not encrypted. I suspect the reason for this is that say you run a web server on 1.2.3.4. But there's 4 different websites hosted on that server each with their own SSL/TLS keys.

The server doesn't have a way to know which keys/certificates to use until it knows what site you want to access. So, the initial request is encrypted with a server key, and that server key is fetched via DNS over HTTPS.

Now, here's the question. Why MUST it be DoH? For email, DKIM, SPF and DMARC settings (including public keys) are configured using standard DNS (with DNSSEC). Why do they not allow DNSSEC AND/OR DoH?

Other than that weird limitation, I think it's a good thing.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I updated my PC just a week or so ago. Finally moved away from a case with external drive bays. That case was just not able to keep a 3080 cool.

Honestly, I had a Bluray drive in there that was not used in so long, that on my previous upgrade four years ago, in that case I forgot to reconnect it and only found out last week when I was taking it apart for the re-used parts.

A little rant about lemmy.ml

I like a lot of the communities on that instance, but every once in a while I just get hit with a random wave of toxicity by them for no reason. For example, there was a post asking which communities from Reddit do you wish existed on Lemmy, and I answered honestly saying more car related communities as they are one of my...

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

That was also the case on reddit though. It's just the demographic making up the norm were somewhat different. So, different subjects will get that response.

My solution is posting from my own kbin instance. I only see the upvotes here :P

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Tell you a weird thing. I activated with a £5 Windows 7 ultimate OEM key on my old system. I upgraded from Intel 9th gen to AMD ryzen 7 (AM5), new mobo, ram, CPU.

Still enabled and active. I fully expected to need to activate again.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I think the apple connector was a good one. Nothing wrong with it except that it was apple licensed. Whereas USB-C is a standard. Also, because of Power Delivery over USB-C I think that should make USB a standard connector on way more devices. It's a one-stop shop for data and power needs.

I can also see PD becoming the power system used for all small devices, especially once there's (if not already) some very low cost single chip (or very simple reference circuit) solutions for handling the negotiation. Also it will need more of the available PD chargers/supplies to support more voltages.

My work laptop already uses PD, and that was useful when I forgot to take the supply once. Just used my 45W PD charger that I DID pack, and it worked fine (it should have 65W, but it seemed not to discharge).

Who knows, maybe houses in the future will be built with some PD wiring too alongside the standard mains power.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Yeah, I'm thinking more a whole wiring solution for power delivery. Although you'd probably still need a chip per outlet to do the negotiation. So still pretty expensive I'd bet.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

Yes, I've had one or two sales pitches in my time after admitting to being a software developer.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

I actually got one of these second hand for a holiday to replace an ancient tablet that had a battery life measured in minutes.

It's really good for the money I think.

r00ty ,
@r00ty@kbin.life avatar

And don't get me started on "legitimate interest" cookies. Legitimate to whom?

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • drbboard
  • random
  • tech
  • updates
  • til
  • testing
  • bitcoincash
  • programming
  • Sacramento
  • All magazines