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lukas

@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me

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lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

This is a common misconception. Non-US countries have computers, but only a privileged few know how to use them: https://youtu.be/IrCQh1usdzE?t=944

lukas , (edited )
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Like auto update and auto driver installation? They expired for sure, but especially the auto driver installation patent is hilarious. Like no shit sherlock: Check internet for driver with the device md5 hash and the version of the driver installer. Download driver if it's a newer version. Install driver if md5 hash matches. Repeat for all devices, and that's fucking it. Plus an irrelevant figure that shows a computer connected to a printer, scanner and the internet. 3 pages in total, of which 1 page is a copy of another page, so only 2 real pages in total.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Shame that we don't have a proper copyleft license tho? GPL, as nice as the intentions are, is a license so convoluted that I'm not sure whether it'd hold up in court in my country.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

I love the free software ideals, but I think we've got a different understanding about what constitutes a good and a bad license. What many people seem to forget about software licenses is that there are these other countries besides America. They couldn't care less about whatever judges rule over there. A good license is a dumb simple license that anyone can enforce in court with ease. A bad license is a convoluted license that crumbles like a house of cards in court. I read the GPL. It's convoluted. It's an opaque terms of service agreement riddled with legal boilerplate disguised as software license. A poor execution of the ideals I hold. I only use the GPL as a formality to say that I support the free software ideals, but I have zero confidence in enforcing the GPL.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

None of the above. 64-bit, 64 bit, x86-64, 1000000 bit, amd or i772.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Let's use Ubuntu for comparison.

  • Ubuntu is more up-to-date than its spin-offs.
  • Ubuntu will outlive Ubuntu spin-offs, including Zorin.
  • Ubuntu offers paid support, whereas Zorin doesn't.
  • Ubuntu community is bigger than Zorin. More resources, tutorials, etc.

Zorin adds only the following value:

  • More themes, primarily lookalikes, which is arguably a bad thing.

When people see Windows, they expect Windows. Installers, package managers, peripherals like printers, etc. are different from Windows. Pretending to be Windows makes people feel at ease for a moment at the expense of fundamentally misunderstanding what operating system their computer runs on, and it'll trip them up eventually, probably sooner rather than later.

See macOS: It looks and feels different. People don't mistake macOS for Windows. People who use Windows don't expect macOS to behave like Windows, and vice-versa. But hey, let's make macOS look and feel like Windows at first glance. Why can't I run that .exe? What do you mean, I must use an app store? What is HDCP, and why does it prevent me from connecting this laptop to the projector?

For iOS that'd be questions like: Where is the Play Store? Why can't I install that (Android-only) app? I think you get my point.

This is one of the reasons why branding exists. Yet many Linux distros would like to believe they can replicate the Windows experience through a miracle, and fool themselves into thinking that's a good thing for Linux newcomers. It's especially bad for people who don't know they use Linux, like when they use computers at the office, library, etc. with a distro like Zorin.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Definitely count these other DEs into my criticism. They're part of the problem.

lukas , (edited )
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Copyright doesn't encourage new works. If anything, copyright discourages new works by locking fair use and transformative behind an expensive legal process. Digitization in America is illegal by default except for books where a judge ruled it's transformative enough.

The proven method to encourage new works is to have no copyright. But alas, publishers back then didn't appreciate that others print "their" books. Higher quality cover? More durable paper? Book is out of print? Zero profits? Give me money or fuck off. Publishers sure didn't change.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Yeah sure let's ignore out of print books that nobody will ever see again unless you pirate it.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Hard if not impossible to say. It depends on what they host. Hosting also gets real expensive if they make poor choices.

If they choose to host their WordPress piracy website on WordPress.com, then that's a shit idea. They're overpriced as hell, even with an annual discount. 300 € annually is WordPress.com's discounted price for a somewhat usable, but still restricted WordPress instance. Furthermore, pirates face the risk that hosting providers terminate their account and keep the money, so long billing periods are risky.

They accept that risk to save some cash, and use WordPress.com. Okay, now what? WordPress.com terminates the account at the start of the new billing period and keeps the money. How sweet. Pay 300 € for the privilege of another restricted WordPress instance. Annual spending: 600 € for what could've been 21.12 € annually with a dumb simple Hetzner webspace.

You may think that this is impossible, nobody is dumb enough to spend 600 € when a 21.12 € solution is good enough, right? Look no further than any company that lifts and shifts apps into the cloud that weren't designed to run in the cloud. Expensive as hell for no fucking reason other than it's in the cloud now. Or this poor fella who got a $ 30 gift card for saving their employer $ 500,000 with five clicks.

lukas , (edited )
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I didn't know that. Yeah, that sounds reasonable if they need it. It's probably best to view my original comment from the perspective that they don't need these benefits.

lukas , (edited )
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

Domain name ~$15/year

.com starts at $10.28/year

Offshore server providers usually start around $30/server/month and quickly raise to thousands

Proxy everything from cheap offshore servers to servers from legit hosting providers with fair pricing.

Corporate application techs are usually $2k-200k/month depending on size

Ops are a tech themselves, work with techs they split donations with or pay or nothing at all, or become a tech themselves as time goes on.

Anything that requires a GPU would be a custom build, dell power edge is a powerful machine you can lookup retail for

True, but a website like FitGirl Repacks needs no GPU.

Storage Amazon s3 is $0.022 per GB/month

Don't use Amazon S3 if pricing is a concern.

Keep in mind that providers [...] often provide multiple releases codexes, resolutions and providing a lot more than people are requesting

I'm not sure what to say about that? They sure can do that for images, but not for game repacks.

You often have to pay for networking as well which scales exponentially

Pirates don't build on-prem data centers, they rent servers or services.

Email accounts are usually $10/user/month any time would come from a senior developer ~120+k/year

No, they can re-use whatever server they use for email. Why pay a senior developer ~120+k/year for email?

But they are likely full stack developers so it might be closer to 200k in the US

If a developer works with a pirate, they don't get paid a wage. They're part of the operation, and get paid depending on the donations or nothing at all.

And servers to run development environments (double the costs above!!!)

The development environment can be on the server or even on the dev's laptop. They already paid for that, so $0.

And infrastructure like Jenkins/monitoring which can scale high as well, but likely <$20k/year

Put it on the server. Scalability isn't practical for pirates to begin with. If they lay all eggs in one basket for maximum scalability and cost savings, then the cloud provider can end their entire operation.

Starfield design lead says players are "disconnected" from how games are actually made: "Don't fool yourself into thinking you know why it is the way it is" (www.gamesradar.com)

apparently this is in response to a few threads on Reddit flaming Starfield—in general, it's been rather interesting to see Bethesda take what i can only describe as a "try to debate Starfield to popularity" approach with the game's skeptics in the past month or two. not entirely sure it's a winning strategy, personally.

lukas , (edited )
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

I get the frustration here, but it's also kind of... idk? A “No, you just don't understand!” response. Everyone who works in a white-collar job knows what it's like. Everyone has different theories about why that project failed, but nobody knows the objective truth. Nobody can present a “documented and verified” list of reasons for why the project failed, not even the lead designer here. They can guess, but never reach the truth. He could repeat what he always did without changing anything in the next project, and succeed due to different circumstances, plain good luck.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

... from committing the severe crime of copyright infringement, of course!

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

We're talking about Word documents, right? People hate when a line wraps in the information block, or their fold and hole marks move, each time anyone with LibreOffice touches their letters. Or their crop, bleed, registration, fold marks, color bars, and safety margins when they print anything professionally. Sorry people, but Word documents require precision sometimes. They look the same, even across several major Word versions. If LibreOffice can't guarantee that, then you can't use LibreOffice in an MS Office environment where precision is necessary, and this starts with letters.

lukas ,
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

There is no anti-cheat, instead a global ban tracking system was put in place and server admins are now able to share the identities of players who have been caught cheating, banning them on every server, regardless of who is running them, by the hosts simply opting into the global ban system.

A global ban system without a more nuanced approach is a terrible idea. Operators of that global ban system will whitelist themselves, blacklist people they hate, and maybe even backdoor the mod that enables them to ban people in the first place. Server admins have no choice but to either opt into the entire system or have none at all, and both of these options suck. We've seen how this plays out already.

Score players by your own criteria, weight everything with different blacklists, greylists and whitelists, etc. and ban players if they exceed a threshold automatically. It won't be perfect, but email catches most spam emails that way just fine.

lukas , (edited )
@lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

I didn't describe what could happen, but what did happen in real life. Multiple times.

MCBans is open-source btw, yet nobody checked and changed the source code, as should be expected really. Operators whitelisted alts and friends. Blacklisted server owners who didn't appreciate that the operators of their global ban list griefed their servers with backdoors.

Another typical example is 3rd-party Discord ban lists. They whitelist their own staff. They backdoor their bots to fuck around with servers. It's just the reality of global ban lists.

If Erlite doesn't abuse that trust, then someone with admin access will, or Erlite's successor. That's a fact, not an opinion. Email spam filters prevent single trust lists with scores, multiple lists, etc.

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  • lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Unlimited is never unlimited. Why nobody forces them to disclose this clearly is a mystery to me. An unlimited contract with 5 TB data for 15€/m is better than an unlimited contract with 1 TB data for 15€/m, given everything else is aight.

    web/low memory alternatives to Krita and GIMP please

    recently I bought a Chromebook, I love it so much, it has Linux container enabled and I downloaded Firefox, GIMP, and Krita, but my Chromebook is only 64GB, so that can be a lot!!! So what web apps or low storage alternatives can I use?? I know Photopea, but what about drawing? Thank you!!

    lukas , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    I'm not sure what you mean. Artists use Photoshop for drawing, yet Adobe advertises Photoshop mostly for image editing. Even though Adobe advertises Photoshop for image editing, which should include fully editing your own photographs imo, the only proper Denoise AI is built into Lightroom lol. Photopea also supports pressure sensitivity, so it should work just fine for drawing. Tools aren't that big of a deal. People who design beautiful presentation decks use PowerPoint after all... with the default system fonts.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    I like your thinking, comrade

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Lists of things not to do:

    • (NEW!) Go through airport security with an encrypted laptop, sensitive information and free conference stickers showing your affiliations as an activist. Let airport security confiscate your laptop. Airport security drugs and wrenches you. You give them your laptop password. The police arrests you based on suspicions of terrorism.
    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Force people to move to Wayland. Everyone that complains about Wayland breaking their setup knows how to install Xorg anyways. But most Wayland problems are software vendors not giving a shit. Make them give a shit by breaking their shit by default on most setups. 10 years was enough time to make your software work on Wayland. If your software doesn’t work on Wayland by now, then your risk management is shit.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    If that’s the case, then stick to Xorg for now. But that doesn’t change the fact that it’s in your best interest for distros to ship with Wayland out of the box.

    Do you want software you use to be compatible with Wayland now or later? If your answer is later, then you have to wait for vendors to catch up, even though Wayland got auto type (already exists) and screen magnification by then. This is why I never understood this push against Wayland. People, your only alternative to Wayland is dead and unmaintained. If you push against Wayland as the default option, you only make your transition in the future more painful than it needs to be.

    Also, I think it’s still a software vendor problem. If your software can’t work with the only desktop protocol with a future, then you must contribute to the protocol to create a way to make it work. If you don’t do that, then shit happens, your software breaks, and you had 10 years to contribute to the protocol to fix it. Your risk management was once again exceptional at avoiding doing the necessary work to eliminate a long known risk.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Read again

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Nobody’s pushing “against Wayland”. I don’t give a shit about Wayland or Xorg. What I care about is having a full-featured, easy to use desktop stack readily available.

    Install Xorg yourself. Don’t make it easily accessible to new Linux users. Software vendors will take note and postpone doing any work for as long as possible.

    And you obviously care a lot about Wayland and Xorg.

    The “dead” Xorg works perfectly with everything. That’s the bar.

    No, it doesn’t. And if it does, then it’s still insecure by design. When I hear statements like these, I get the urge to publish PoC Linux malware code on GitHub that uses X11 specific features to show just how not fine it is.

    The Wayland choice of pushing complexity onto individual software projects by making them all reinvent a hundred wheels, and onto users by making them hunt down a hundred pieces of software to build a wobbly desktop stack sucks.

    Substitute Wayland for X11 here. Both Wayland and X11 are protocols. X11 is such a lackluster protocol that all implementations died, except that Xorg still has users.

    lukas , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Oh yeah?

    That must explain why Xorg always crashes and burns when I don’t use the correct combination of desktop environment, compositor and driver version.

    Let’s not ignore that Xorg doesn’t and never has been working for everyone. At least default to the sane option with a future.

    lukas , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    If you still want to give Wayland a try, take a look at wiki.archlinux.org/title/wayland#Electron. Electron still defaults to X11, even though Electron supports Wayland. It’s a bit annoying to set the command line parameters for apps that bundle Electron, but maybe it works for you.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Man, that’d be horrible! Imagine people could exercise their rights. Thank God we live in a world of zero digital ownership with anti DRM circumvention laws to strip everyone from rights copyright laws are supposed to grant. We can sue anyone that scans books and lends them out 1:1 as that’s untransformative and unfair use. But hey, it’s a free market! Let’s offer them e-books with DRM for $15 that libraries can only lend out 15 times, 20 hours total read time or three months after purchase, whichever comes first, and then jack up the price to $30 when they’re locked into the ecosystem. Sounds like a fair deal to me! Not like they have an alternative.

    I Made Screen Brightness Control on Gnome Much Better (gitlab.gnome.org)

    Anyone here struggle with trying to adjust brightness on Gnome in low light? At the low end, the steps are way too far apart, and at high brightness they’re almost imperceptible. Every other operating system uses a brightness curve that better matches human perception....

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Thank you.

    I hate that most Linux brightness controls assume that humans perceive brightness linearly for some reason. I don’t want a flash bang in dark surroundings when I forget to use the slider. I don’t want to press my brightness up key a thousand times or resort to the slider in bright surroundings.

    So yes, please merge this.

    lukas , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    You can’t trust VPN providers to store no logs. It’s impossible to verify. I don’t get why people downvote this comment.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    VPN providers don’t protect you from malware.

    lukas , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    DNS blacklists also don’t protect you from most malware.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    You conflate VPN providers have an incentive to store no logs with it’s impossible to verify whether VPN providers store logs. It’s like trusting your friend to keep a secret. They promise not to write down what you say, but you can’t be sure. You accept that risk in your threat model, and that’s fine. But newcomers should judge that risk themselves. I feel like “Don’t worry bro, they don’t keep logs.” is an inappropriate response to people that’re about to commit a crime that can land them in jail.

    lukas OP ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Checks notes, it says that I’m human, but idk for sure.

    lukas OP ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    No, it’s the labyrinth map of the Maze Runner movie.

    lukas OP , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    This only skips step 1 – 5 for Crunchyroll. You still have 8 steps to go. Nevermind, they’ve got email addresses for privacy inquiries, hidden beneath their infinite scroll anime overview, in the “Your Rights” section, behind the “this page” link. Although I wonder whether they force you to go through their painful process nevertheless.

    lukas OP , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar
    lukas OP ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    This is about account deletion, not cancellation. But cancellation is also a fun topic in its own right. I don’t know about Germany, but cancellations are a solved problem here in Austria, even accounting for shady business practices. 3rd-party services exist that fully automate the cancellation process for most cases. They email the company, send another reminder email, store the email server response as evidence for court, and submit a complaint to the responsible Schlichtungsstelle, which then light a fire under their ass to cancel your service. If they’re retarded enough to not cancel your service, then you can always take them to court with the stored evidence.

    lukas OP ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Customers obviously don’t understand the value we provide them, so we must force them to continue to use and pay for our services. They get a once in a lifetime opportunity to understand just how valuable our services are. If they still don’t understand, they merely didn’t see the light yet, and must continue to pay and use our services.

    lukas OP ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Most piracy websites don’t need accounts to pirate content. You don’t need to delete accounts if you don’t need accounts. Therefore, account deletion is a zero step process for the average pirate, compared to Crunchyroll’s eye-watering 13 steps. So yeah, I think this is related to piracy.

    lukas OP ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    AI among us.

    lukas OP , (edited )
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    I didn’t like their service, so I cancelled my account and deleted it like I always do. Not sure why others delete their accounts. Edit: How ironic that they were sued for violating privacy lol.

    lukas OP ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    I can’t find anything about this on the web. Did they rebrand?

    Hollywood to UK Govt: Investigating Pirates "Increasingly Difficult" * TorrentFreak (lemmy.dbzer0.com)

    Summary: A recent UK government inquiry into the challenges faced by the film and high-end television industry has recently received submissions from major Hollywood studios advocating for KYC (know your customer) rules for hosting providers, similar to banking regulations to identify money laundering. If adopted, this would...

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Ain’t nobody needs to know the finances of my web3 unregistered securities pyramid scheme fraud.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Russia has KYC regulations as well. Mostly to censor people, but still.

    lukas ,
    @lukas@lemmy.haigner.me avatar

    Copyright today is shit tho. It’d be more logical to talk about how much it costs the public to maintain a fundamentally broken system to keep a few companies with a dysfunctional business model on life support.

    Rights holders take people and organisations to court for a lot of shit that should be thrown straight out of court. But no no, the people who protect and protected the interests of organisations that benefit from copyright laws wrote the copyright laws. If they couldn’t pass their extremist copyright laws locally, they’d try again nationally, then internationally, until their contradictory and ass-backwards copyright laws got passed. Other countries copied these laws.

    • Copyright laws implicit registration robs the public domain of works made by unidentifiable authors.
    • Copyright laws force the digital world to play by impossible rules.
    • Copyright laws forbid DRM circumvention, but that contradicts with existing copyright rights.
    • Copyright laws forbid digitization of analog media if the judge considers this untransformative or unfair use.
    • Copyright laws may allow snippet taxes for daring to use an excerpt of a news article without paying an arm and a leg.
    • Copyright laws may forbid fair use, banning reviews, etc.
    • Copyright laws force libraries to buy e-books under unfair conditions due to DRM and the digitization edge case.

    … the list goes on. Copyright laws in their current form should be thrown in the trash and burned alive while we can. The EU Copyright Directive is so fundamentally broken that member states postpone enacting the directive into national laws, years after the set deadline. Member states copy and paste the directive, unwilling to spend the effort to revise existing laws to conform to the over-reaching copyright directive.

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