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jonberger

@jonberger@sfba.social

Lawyer and amateur musician from Sonoma County, California. Will share cute pictures of his cats on the slightest provocation.

This profile is from a federated server and may be incomplete. Browse more on the original instance.

lowqualityfacts , to random
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I love Steve Buschemi.
https://patreon.com/lowqualityfacts

jonberger ,
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@lowqualityfacts Somewhat lower quality spelling than usual . . . 😀

georgetakei , to random
@georgetakei@universeodon.com avatar

Philomena!!

jonberger ,
@jonberger@sfba.social avatar

@georgetakei I would pay a great deal of money to see that.

georgetakei , to random
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jonberger ,
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@georgetakei I guess I should be happy that there's one actual journalist in the world, but all this really does is emphasize how pathetic all the rest of them are.

georgetakei , to random
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jonberger ,
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MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon
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Today in Labor History January 19, 1812: Luddites torched Oatlands Mill in Yorkshire, England. In order to avoid losing their jobs to machines, Luddites destroyed equipment in protest. Their movement was named for Ned Ludd, a fictional weaver who supposedly smashed knitting frames after being whipped by his boss. Luddite rebellions continued from 1811-1816, until the military quashed their uprising.

Chant no more your old rhymes about bold Robin Hood
His feats I but little admire
I will sing the Achievements of General Ludd
Now the Hero of Nottinghamshire.

The sentiment for this poem comes from the fact that Robin Hood was a paternalistic hero, a displaced aristocrat who stole from his class brethren and gave to the poor; whereas Ned Ludd represented the autonomy and self-sufficiency of the working class.

@bookstadon

jonberger ,
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Passamezzo , to histodons
@Passamezzo@mastodon.social avatar

Today is Twelfth Eve - the day before the Twelfth Day of Christmas, so here is Twelfth Eve from Playford's Dancing Master, 1701.
Alison Kinder: recorder
Eleanor Cramer: bass viol
Christopher Goodwin: lute
Peter Luke Kenny: drum
Tamsin Lewis: violin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4m5sHosczI&ab_channel=Passamezzo


@histodons
@earlymusic

jonberger ,
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@Passamezzo @histodons @earlymusic Lovely recording! The dance is going to appear in Andrew Shaw's upcoming new book of dance reconstructions, and my band just recorded Twelfe Eve (original spelling) for the accompanying CD.

GottaLaff , to random
@GottaLaff@mastodon.social avatar

Jenna Ellis was a loyal Trumpette, now posts this:

"Don Jr’s pick for press sec is claiming I am “disloyal harlot” & “going to hell”

No mention tho' of Jr’s divorce, his gf’s divorce from Newsom, or The Best Christian Ever screwing a porn star while his 3rd wife was pregnant

Apparently true Christianity is not based on belief in Christ as Lord, but rather belief in Trump as Savior, King & next Pres!

Repent & trust 27-D chess, guys… personnel picks WILL be better this time!"

jonberger ,
@jonberger@sfba.social avatar

@GottaLaff "Imagine my shock and surprise when I found out about Trump screwing the porn star while his third wife was pregnant," Ellis added. "I had no idea about that back when I was devoting my life to keeping him in power after he lost an election, because I lived under a rock with no access to newspapers, television, or the Internet. If I, a true Christian and believer in Christ as Lord, had had the least inkling that he did those things, I would of course have been horrified and disgusted and I would never have supported him in any way. But how was I to know?"

MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon
@MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

“Michael Dunn has created the characters that bring the 19th Century's Mine Wars to life for today's readers. Anywhere but Schuylkill will remind readers of John Sayles and Tillie Olsen and the best in the long tradition of labor literature.”

—James Tracy, co-author of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing

Available at: https://www.thehistoricalfictioncompany.com/michael-dunn

@bookstadon

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  • jonberger ,
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    @MikeDunnAuthor @bookstadon Looks like it's only available as an ebook. Any idea what software I'd need to read it, and what platforms it runs on?

    jonberger ,
    @jonberger@sfba.social avatar

    @MikeDunnAuthor @bookstadon No problem; I'm happy to read it on a device. I just didn't want to end up with an ebook that I have to install a $50 piece of software to read, but if it works in Kindle, we're golden.

    sabrinaschalz , to academicchatter
    @sabrinaschalz@fediscience.org avatar

    Really happy to share that I passed my PhD viva today! 🥳

    I studied eavesdropping on speech in wild carrion crows in the UK, you can read the main paper here:
    animalbehaviorandcognition.org/article.php?id=1348

    @academicchatter @phdstudentd

    jonberger ,
    @jonberger@sfba.social avatar

    @sabrinaschalz @academicchatter @phdstudents Did you by any chance hear one of them asking another one "Where shall we gang and dine the day-o?" It's well documented that they do that sometimes.

    MikeDunnAuthor , (edited ) to bookstadon
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History August 25, 1819: Allan Pinkerton was born. He founded the Pinkerton private police force, whose strike breaking detectives (Pinkertons, or 'Pinks') slaughtered dozens of workers in various labor struggles. Ironically, Pinkerton was a violent, radical leftist as a youth. He fought cops in the streets as a member of the Chartist Movement. He had to flee the UK in order to not be imprisoned and executed. Yet in America, he became the nation’s first super cop. He created the secret service. He foiled an assassination attempt against Lincoln. He fine-tuned the art of spying on activists and planting agents provocateur in their ranks. His agents played a major role in destroying the miners’ union in the 1870s, as portrayed in my novel, “Anywhere But Schuylkill.” Later, they assassinated numerous organizers with the IWW and came within inches of successfully getting Big Bill Hayward convicted on trumped up murder charges.

    Anywhere But Schuylkill will be out in early September, 2023, from Historium Press: https://www.thehistoricalfictioncompany.com/it/michael-dunn

    You can read my satirical biography of Pinkerton here: https://marshalllawwriter.com/the-eye-that-never-sleeps/

    @bookstadon

    jonberger ,
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    @MikeDunnAuthor @bookstadon Tangential point, but are you sure that "Pinkerton" is the origin of "fink"? I've always heard that it's from the German word for "finch," and refers to someone who sings in the sense of being an informer, same idea as a "stool pigeon." "Fink" is often seen in the context of "rat fink," in which "rat" also means an informer, as in to "rat someone out." P-to-f transitions are certainly common enough; that's how we got "father" from "pater," for example. But this is the first I've ever heard of that being where we got "fink."

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History August 18, 1812: Lady Ludd led the Luddite Corn Market riot of women and boys in Leeds, England. Luddites also rioted in Sheffield against flour and meal sellers. England was suffering huge food shortages and inflation at the time, in part because of the War of 1812, which had started in June, and the ongoing Napoleonic wars. Additionally, new technological innovations were allowing mill owners to replace many of their employees with machines. In response, Luddites would destroy looms and other equipment. To try and get control over these worker outrages, the British authorities made illegal oath-taking punishable by death in July 1812. And they also empowered magistrates to forcibly enter private homes to search for weapons. They also stationed thousands of troops in areas where rioting and looting had occurred over the summer.

    “Shirley” (1849), Charlotte Bronte’s second novel, takes place in Yorkshire, 1811-1812, during the Luddite uprisings. It was originally published under the pseudonym, Currer Bell. The novel opens with a ruthless mill owner waiting for the delivery of new, cost-saving equipment that will allow him to fire many of his workers, but Luddites destroy the equipment before it reaches him. As a result of the novel’s popularity, Shirley became a popular female name. Prior to this, it was mostly a male name.

    @bookstadon

    jonberger ,
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