@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

danielquinn

@danielquinn@lemmy.ca

Canadian software engineer living in Europe.

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danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

yt-dlp is pretty much the authoritative solution for this these days.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Watch the video. The selection of bike infrastructure is done so in a frame of lowest cost with highest benefit, and this is couched in the explanation that there's no one thing to solve everything but rather a series of things that all must be done.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

If you really want an app-like interface, you could make use of Epiphany's "Install as Web App" feature. Just open Epiphany, go to your Lemmy instance, login, and then select "Install as Web App" from the main menu. Like magic, you get a "Lemmy App" that you can bring up like any other app.

This is my experience in GNOME. Presumably though, it'd work with any desktop environment that respects the XDG standards.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I am very disappointed to hear that the bricks are foam.

Adding license after some time with no license?

I have previously written a lot of code that is hosted on a public repo on GitHub, but it never had a license. It was written as part of my work while working for a non-commercial academic entity, and I would like to add a license before the link to the repo will be included in something that will be made public, potentially...

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

These are fun questions! There's a few other things you have to consider though before you can have some answers.

If the work was done for your employer (non-commercial, academic, or otherwise) you should be sure that your work for that organisation did not include the transfer of ownership of the work you create to said organisation. Most organisations that employ people to write software usually include a stipulation in your contract that anything you create "in the course of your employment" (this is a legal term meaning work you do for your job as well as work you might do related to you job as inspiration/necessity for your job etc) is owned by the employer. If that's the case for you, you can't simply re-license the software, even if it's already publicly viewable. You need to seek the consent of the copyright owner to either (a) transfer the ownership to you, or (b) agree to a new license.

Which brings me to the first thing people tend to forget about copyright: unless otherwise stipulated (like through the inclusion of a LICENSE file) all creative works are copyrighted and cannot be copied, imported, modified, distributed, etc. without the express consent of the copyright holder (usually through a licensing agreement).

So with that in mind, and assuming that you already have the copyright to this code, I'll answer your three questions:

1. Can I just add a license after the fact and it will be valid for all prior work?

This is fun question because it hinges on a silly technicality of software development. If you add a license to your repo today, the license applies to the code as of that point in the commit history. There's no official way to say (through the standard of including a file in the repo) that this license applies retroactively, but if you're the sole copyright holder (see notes on this below) of the work in its current state as well as everything that came before (ie. you didn't get PRs from other people thinking they were committing to a project under a proprietary license) then practically speaking, you can apply a Free license to all the old versions because you're the copyright holder -- you can do whatever you want. The problem is a practical one: without a LICENSE file, it's not clear that this software is Free.

Unless you've got a bunch of other people/teams/organisations working off of forks of your current codebase though, it's really just a thought experiment: no one will care because the latest version is Freely licensed. Someone could conceivably fork your repo from an earlier point in history, but without a LICENSE file in that fork, legally speaking that code is solely your property, so copying it would be illegal unless you made a copy for them with a LICENSE file included.

2. Do I have to make sure the license is included in all branches of the repo, or does this not matter? There are for instance a couple of branches that are used to freeze the state of code at a certain time for reproducibility’s sake (I know this could be solved in a better way, but that’s how it is).

There's a lot of overlap here with #1. Basically your old release branches will be copyrighted by you and not licensed Freely. If it's important to you that these releases also be under your new Free license, then yeah, you're going to have to include a new commit on each release branch with your LICENSE file. Personally though, I wouldn't bother. If anyone is using an old release, they'll get the Free version once they upgrade and that's usually good enough for most people.

3. I have myself reused some of the code in my current work for a commercial entity (internal analysis work, only distributed within the organization). Should this influence the type of license I choose? I am considering a GPL-license, but should I go with (what I believe to be) a more permissive license like MIT because of this?

So much of this centres around the current ownership of all code in the repo. If this were a personal project into which no one but you has ever committed any code and for which there's no existing contract stating that your-employer-not-you owns the code, then the answer is really simple: it's your work, you can do whatever you like.

For example, you can write a program, license it under the AGPL3, and post it on GitLab for all the world to see. Strangers from the other side of the planet can download it, modify it, and run it in their own projects so long as they adhere to the AGPL3 license. So long as you don't accept any merge requests from anyone else, you can also re-license the code (or a portion thereof) to a private company (your employer, a contract gig, whatever). Remember, it's your code, you can do with it as you like, so if you choose to give it to a company to build into their proprietary project, there's no problem.

The problem comes once you accept code from someone else. If I submit a merge request to your project that fixes a bug, I do so under the terms of that project's license. My code is AGPL3 because the project's license is AGPL3. You can't now take my bugfix and copy that into a private project because I didn't grant you that right. This is why re-licensing a Free software project, even from GPL-2 to GPL-3 can be really painful: you have to contact each contributor and acquire the right to change the license.

So, TL;DR: if it's 100% your code, you can make 10 copies, all under different licenses. Do whatever you want. If it's 99% your code, you're bound by the license in affect at the time those other contributions were made.

[Source: I'm a Free software nerd with a penchant for copyright, so much so that I married a copyright lawyer so we talk about this stuff a lot.]

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Interesting. I wonder if this code would fall under the license of the publication then? The blurry line between documentation licenses and software licenses is usually when I stop and go ask my wife :-)

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

That's fair, though if you're looking for something more legally ironclad, I'm not sure I would want to depend on a declaration like that. But you're right, as the sole copyright holder, you can choose to apply your licence any way you like, so long as it's clear (for some value of clear) to the recipient that the software, what the license is.

danielquinn , (edited )
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

That's a good question. I believe there is official text for "GPL-3 or later" that you can use, which should (I just asked the wife to be sure) then let you re-license the project to GPL-4 later. This is probably possible because the "or later" portion of the license text includes consent by contributors for the future change.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

When I stepped away from my own (mildly successful) Free software project, I had the same concerns: it's about the reputation.

The project had earned a decent amount of trust when I was running it, and presumably people were installing new updates without going over the changes. If I handed off the project to someone new, I wasn't just handing over the work, but that trust as well.

So rather than handing over the project to someone new, I archived it and someone else (thankfully someone not-evil) forked it. Anyone installing the fork immediately understood that the relationship was new. They'd have to decide whether to trust this new maintainer or not.

For my money, this is the way. If you're burning out, remember that your reputation is tied to your project name, and that it has considerable value. If you don't want to continue, the disruption of a fork is better/safer than the smooth-but-risky hand-off.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

You can always just reset your git history:

$ git reset [your first commit hash]
$ git add .
$ got commit -m "Collapse git history"
$ git push -f
danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Why didn't this become a thing? Surely in 2024, we should be able to build packages from source and sign releases with a private key.

Stat Can Data Raises More Concerns About ‘Non-Lethal’ Israel Exports ( www.readthemaple.com )

Amid a lack of precise information about Canadian military goods being sold to Israel, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau have repeatedly claimed that only “non-lethal” goods have been authorized for export since October 7....

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Not all of the EU. I understand Ireland is very vocal about doing the right thing.

Germany on the other hand seems wholly in capable of being on the right side of a genocide.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

For what value of "self sufficient" does this apply? Most people simply don't have the land required to obtain anything in that column. Even acquiring enough water to drink is quite impossible for many. The idea that everyone not living on a farm would be self sufficient enough to provide tomatoes, fruit, water, energy, etc for themselves is rather unreasonable, no? This is after all one of the big benefits of specialisation.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

What about blog spam though? Surely this would relinquish controls like moderation for your site?

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Are they refusing patches, or are you just expecting people to do what you want for free?

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Ooh! Thanks for this! I had no idea it existed.

danielquinn , (edited )
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I recommend writing everything in Bourne shell (/bin/sh) for a few reasons:

  • Bash is more capable, which is nice, but if you're fiddling with complex data structures, you probably should be using a more maintainable language like Python.
  • Bash is in most places, but crucially not everywhere. Docker-based deployments for example often use Ash which is very similar to Bash, but lacks support for arrays and a few other things.
  • Bourne's limitations force you to rethink your choices regularly. If you find yourself hacking around a lack of associative arrays for example, it's probably time to switch to a proper language.

Also two bits of advice.

  1. Use shellcheck. There's a website that'll check your script for you as well as a bunch of editor extensions that'll do it in real time. You will absolutely write better, safer code with it.
  2. If your script exceeds 300 lines. Stop and rewrite it in a proper language. Your future self will thank you.
danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Probably because he cites a lot of stats that might be true, but then couches it in bits the viewer may recognise as misleading.

His attacks on YouTubers for example included
Kurzgesagt (which he's used as a punching bag before with some rather shallow accusations) where he suggests that they promote carbon capture. If you watch the actual video though, while it does mention CCS as an option, it's quickly followed by a great deal of caution about how technology won't save us.

The clip with Mark Rober and Bill Gates is another one. That video was about meat-free food, something that I would think this guy would support, but he framed it with voiceover and dark music like it's all a conspiracy to make you complacent while the Big Bad Rich Assholes eat your brain.

I agree with the premise, but I won't reshare poorly-researched propaganda.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I think Emudeck is available as a Flatpak, so you should be able to install it on your desktop too.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Oh really? Boo.

Retrodeck looks good, but the recommended install instructions were just too nutty for me: curl https://... | bash is not ok.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Well that looks promising. Last time I looked into it, I was put off by a shell script that called sudo, but if it's bound to a Flatpak, I can work with that.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Ahh, yeah that's about what I remember. Too messy for me. This sounds like it'd be better as an actual package (apt/pacman) then.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Yup. I've had more than a few people claim I had to "give up my man card" because I love musicals, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Sex in the City.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I haven't! But I'll check it out. I am however Very Excited about the new Wicked movie.

danielquinn , (edited )
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I'm afraid I'm not familiar enough to with the genre to speak about any particular category being good or bad, but I can give you an idea of what I like/hate.

For theatre, I loved Wicked. I saw it three times and would do it again. Hamilton was also brilliant but Les Miserables and Phantom of the Opera were really hard on my ears. I think it's the whole "We need some dialogue here, but it's a musical, so let's have them sing it" that does it. If that's your experience with musicals, believe me when I tell you, they aren't all like that. Some are heart-shatteringly beautiful with complex harmonies and the sort of music that makes you feel like you can fly right out of that theatre. Wicked's "Defying Gravity" still gives me chills when I think about it, and the way Hamilton is stitched together with callbacks between each song: "my shot", "running out of time", "wait for it", "that would be enough"... it's just amazing work.

There's also an excellent off-broadway musical called "Evil Dead: The Musical" and it's as bad-in-a-good-way-campy as you think. There's zombies, a splatter zone, and some seriously smart & funny songs in there, including my favourite: "What the Fuck Was That?". I mean, it's not good music, but it's fun :-)

But Cats... that was cancer for my ears. It was my first musical and nearly soured me on them entirely.

But it's not just theatre! I love movie musicals too! Moulin Rouge's Ewan McGreggor is just jaw-droppingly talented. The finalé (until the curtains close anyway) is punch-the-air-feel-amazing. Another good one is The Greatest Showman: not quite as amazeballs as Moulin Rouge, but surprisingly inspiring, and the duet between Zac Effron and Zendaya definitely has that "life is beautiful" feel to it. Also, "Never Enough" is great too. I also have a deep, deep love for Pitch Perfect.

Then there's tv! The Buffy musical kinda started it all, and while it's not nearly as musically complex as the aforementioned, it's clever, funny, and 20 years later I can still hear it in my head. "I think this line's mostly filler" was a nice touch. Since then though, there have been a number of attempts at musical episodes of favourite shows. Most recently, Star Trek: Strange New Worlds did a fantastic job with some right bangers. The reigning champion of course is Glee with some awesome stuff [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

So yeah, it ranges. I'd recommend Wicked & Hamilton to anyone not sure if they can get into musicals, largely because they don't do that "sing dialogue" thing that I think grates on a lot of people. After that, look for shows starring people you know to be awesome. Kristen Chenoweth for example is a guaranteed win for me. She is absolutely delightful on stage.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Excluding the obvious choice of Jeffrey Combs as... well anyone really, I'm rather fond of Andreas Katsulas, though I may be partial to him for his phenomenal role as G'Kar on Babylon 5.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

There have been some great answers on this so far, but I want to highlight my favourite part of Docker: the disposability.

When you have a running Docker container, you can hop in, fuck about with files, break stuff as you try to figure something out, and then kill the container and all of the mess you've created is gone. Now tweak your config and spin up a fresh one exactly the way you need it.

You've been running a service for 6 months and there's a new upgrade. Delete your instance and just start up the new one. Worried that there might be some cruft left over from before? Don't be! Every new instance is a clean slate. Regular, reproducible deployments are the norm now.

As a developer it's even better: the thing you develop locally is identical to the thing that's built, tested, and deployed in CI.

I <3 Docker!

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

"Yankees, in six games" -- "One Small Step" is comfort food for me. A close second is "The Siege of AR-558"

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Aren't there a bunch of charges she could fall under? Incitement, threats?

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

yt-dlp might be able to do the job. It has options for you to specify credentials too.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Nifty! I wrote something similar a couple years ago using Vosk for the stt side. My project went a little further though, automating navigating the programs you start. So you could say: "play the witcher" and it'd check if The Witcher was available in a local Kodi instance, and if not, then figure out which streaming service was running it and launch the page for it. It'd also let you run arbitrary commands and user plugins too!

I ran into two big problems though that more-or-less killed my enthusiasm for developing on it: (1) some of the functionality relied on pyautogui, but with the Linux desktop's transition to Wayland, some of the functionality I relied on was disappearing. (2) I wanted to package it for Flatpak, and it turns out that Flatpak doesn't play well with Python. I was also trying to support both arm64 and amd64 which it turns out is also really hard (omg the pain of doing this for the Pi).

Anyway, maybe the project will serve as some inspiration.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Don't get me started with Mycroft. I bought the 1st gen device and invested a year of my life writing the first incarnation of Majel built on top of it. When it was ready to share I announced it in their internal developers group and was attacked repeatedly for using the AGPL instead of a licence that'd let them steal and privatise it. Here I was offering a year's worth of free labour (and publicity, the project exploded on Reddit), and all they could say was: "use the MIT license so we don't have to contribute anything".

I'm still bitter.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I'm not sure. https://mycroft.ai/ appears to be gone, redirected to https://community.openconversational.ai/. Since the Mycroft devices depended on a central server for configuration (you pushed your config to their website which in turn relayed environment variables to your code), my guess is that the project is dead, but like all good Free software, still out there.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I like Tilix, since it lets me split the terminal with a keyboard shortcut and easily switch between terminals too. I tried using GNOME terminal + tmux, but having to hit Ctrl+b before the command I wanted got tedious fast.

danielquinn , (edited )
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

TL;DR: your assessment is correct. It's just a complicated (and energy intensive!) way of keeping track of things.

They've got this little commune thing going on and they want a way to keep track of people's contributions to community. Because they're blockchain nerds, they reached for their favourite tool and gave it a hippie name: "carrot".

The idea is that every time you do something that's good for community, you get a carrot, and then you can later use those carrots to get stuff. Basically they invented a currency that's only valid in their community, and rather than just issuing coins, they're doing everything digitally.

Now a brief bit about the technology

This digital system uses something called the "blockchain", which is just a MASSIVE file living on hundreds (thousands?) of computers around the world. This file is like a bank ledger: a record of things that happened. Think of it like a text file:

Bob gave Sarah €1.50
Sarah gave Alex €2.00
...

Now imagine that it's hundreds of millions of lines long, and every time anyone in the world gives anyone money, that list gets a little bit longer.

"But how do you make sure that people don't start tinkering with the ledger?" you might say? "I could say "Alex gives me €1000000". Well the files are kept in sync by this protocol where all participating computers do complex math to prove that they haven't edited anything. Everyone else does the same math, and so everyone's results should be the same. If your math is different, you're ignored. This is why transactions can take as much as a few hours or even days to go through and gobble a shittone of electricity. Awesome.

This is basically where Bitcoin came from.

After that was a thing, a bunch of other nerds got together and built Ethereum (same tech, different computers doing the work, so it's a different ledger), which uses the same technology. Ethereum however introduced this thing called "smart contracts" though, which are tiny programs that are baked into the chain (ie. they codified into this Great Big File That Everyone Has so they can't be changed). Smart contracts are simple instructions:

If Bob gives Sarah €1.50, Sarah then owns this: 1234567890

That 1234567890 relates to something in the real world, most famously a URL, which is where you get those NFTs that everyone was crazy about for a few months. Bob can give Sarah $1,000,000 and this would enshrine that Sarah owns https://somwhere.ca/picture-of-cat.jpg and then she can go around and say "I 'own' this picture". Then one day that website takes the picture down and Sarah realises that she paid a million dollars for a record in a text file.

Each transaction on a blockchain (Ethereum, Bitcoin, whatever) costs money, which you pay in that chain's currency, and that's where this all starts to make sense. If I can get you to buy my "magic internet money", then I'm selling you that currency for actual money.

So, back to your question about this commune project.

Putting on my "trust the person first, but only once" hat, it might not be a scam. The website certainly makes it look like they want to build a Solarpunk enclave. Maybe they've opted for a convoluted financial system 'cause they've been drinking the same kool-aid as all those crypto-bros out there trying to sell me their latest fake internet money. Maybe this made sense to them rather than issuing metal coins or even just maintaining a PostgreSQL database publicly. Either way, it's a dumb idea and totally unnecessary. If you do decide to participate, watch for the moment they try to force you to buy their tokens with real money.

Also, you probably haven't seen the definitive take-down of blockchain technology yet. It's long but solidly the best piece of criticism of the tech I've seen.

Full disclosure: I bought into Bitcoin way back when it was cheap 'cause I was fascinated by the techology. Then I learnt how it actually worked, and how it absolutely cannot scale to be anything useful, so I just held onto the coins I had. I cashed out to the tune of about €40k. I absolutely would not recommend "investing" this this stuff. The domain is ripe with scammers and the project has no legs. It's long past the point of experimentation and is now at the stage of trying to drag more suckers in. Don't be that sucker.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

I just answered a similar question to this in another thread, so I'll copy/paste it here with some more info about "web3" specifically:


TL;DR: It's just a complicated (and energy intensive!) way of keeping track of things.

Web3, Bitcoin, Ethereum, and any "coin" you hear about on the web uses something called the "blockchain", which is just a MASSIVE file living on hundreds (thousands?) of computers around the world. This file is like a bank ledger: a record of things that happened. Think of it like a text file:

Bob gave Sarah €1.50
Sarah gave Alex €2.00
...

Now imagine that it's hundreds of millions of lines long, and every time anyone in the world gives anyone money, that list gets a little bit longer.

"But how do you make sure that people don't start tinkering with the ledger?" you might say? "I could say "Alex gives me €1000000". Well the files are kept in sync by this protocol where all participating computers do complex math to prove that they haven't edited anything. Everyone else does the same math, and so everyone's results should be the same. If your math is different, you're ignored. This is why transactions can take as much as a few hours or even days to go through and gobble a shittone of electricity. Awesome.

This is basically where Bitcoin came from.

After that was a thing, a bunch of other nerds got together and built Ethereum (same tech, different computers doing the work, so it's a different ledger), which uses the same technology. Ethereum however introduced this thing called "smart contracts" though, which are tiny programs that are baked into the chain (ie. they codified into this Great Big File That Everyone Has so they can't be changed). Smart contracts are simple instructions:

If Bob gives Sarah €1.50, Sarah then owns this: 1234567890

That 1234567890 relates to something in the real world, most famously a URL, which is where you get those NFTs that everyone was crazy about for a few months. Bob can give Sarah $1,000,000 and this would enshrine that Sarah owns https://somwhere.ca/picture-of-cat.jpg and then she can go around and say "I 'own' this picture". Then one day that website takes the picture down and Sarah realises that she paid a million dollars for a record in a text file.

Each transaction on a blockchain (Ethereum, Bitcoin, whatever) costs money, which you pay in that chain's currency, and that's where this all starts to make sense. If I can get you to buy my "magic internet money", then I'm selling you that currency for actual money.

Web3 is another abstraction on top of this, but most of it is nonsense. If you can use a contract to allocate ownership of something to someone, why not bake that into your website? The claim is that you can "take back the web" from centralised giants like Google & Facebook by "putting your data on the blockchain" and then you can choose to change who owns that data rather than these big companies.

It's a noble idea but tooooootal bullshit. First of all, the web is already open. I host my own website on a Raspberry Pi from my house. The idea that it's technology centralising the web and not capitalism is laughable.

Secondly, by design, everything on the blockchain is open. You get around this with encryption, but if I grant Facebook the rights to my data, they have it. If I change my mind tomorrow, then they still have it. They won't get any new data I append to my records, but I'm not "in control". It's actually much worse. The web3 nerds want us to store everything on the blockchain: browsing habits, mortgages, medical records, and all it takes is one unpatched update, your laptop gets hacked and now I own your house. Fuck That.

You probably haven't seen the definitive take-down of blockchain technology yet. It's long but solidly the best piece of criticism of the tech I've seen. Do watch it. It's far more authoritative than I can ever be.

Full disclosure: I bought into Bitcoin way back when it was cheap 'cause I was fascinated by the techology. Then I learnt how it actually worked, and how it absolutely cannot scale to be anything useful, so I just held onto the coins I had. I cashed out to the tune of about €40k. I absolutely would not recommend "investing" this this stuff. The domain is ripe with scammers and the project has no legs. It's long past the point of experimentation and is now at the stage of trying to drag more suckers in. Don't be that sucker.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

You can do this in about 20min with an actual database.

Blockchains aren't capable of storing any significant amount of data, so at best you'd still have a normal database and an overengineered verification layer. Even then, you still haven't solved the actual problem: availability of the data.

The reason it takes a long time to retrieve the information you want is that it's not already in a searchable database, so someone has to be paid to look it up by hand and create a report for you. If the people with the data were to simply publish a CSV, you'd get everything you need without having to waste time, money, and energy on a blockchain.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Um, no.

  1. Blockchains aren't databases because they can't store any useful amount of data. It's just a publicly-verifiable, append-only list of very small data points. To do something as simple as "look up who owned vehicle X on Y date" you still need a relational database engine like PostgreSQL, MariaDB, MSSQL, etc. Unless of course your application involves people downloading the entire chain locally and running your software on their machine to look up vehicle history. That'd work I suppose, but good luck deploying it, and it's a lot more work than an actual database.
  2. Even if all you needed was a blockchain (you don't) the suggestion that they're easier to setup and publish on the web for public access than an actual database is laughable. You can get Wordpress up & running in about 10 minutes complete with a database, webserver and human-friendly UI to access basic tools. The idea that you can setup anything blockchain-based to be accessible to non-technical people in less than 10 minutes is just nuts.

A blockchain provides zero value to solving this problem. It's more complicated, doesn't lend itself well to web-based deployments, can't store the data we need, and requires the consumption of more energy than necessary while slowing down the process of adding records and making them more expensive.

danielquinn , (edited )
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Upon a cursory read, it sounds like you host a server and then relay all of your data through their centrally controlled system all while also pushing your account data to them.

I'm not sure they understand what "federated" means. Or rather, they know, but they're hoping we don't care.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

It's funny, before this, I was just going to buy a legit copy and play it on my Deck (I have a Switch, but prefer the Deck)

Now, fuck those guys. If I play at all, it'll be on a pirated copy.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

"Do it out of spite". I love it. Thanks for sharing.

danielquinn , (edited )
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

There was a talk on exactly this at a FOSDEM years ago, and the verdict was that licence changes were prohibitively difficult if the project was openly developed because you need to acquire permission to change the licence from every contributor. This is why some projects (React for example) require the signing of a contract in advance of any PR merge that transfers the ownership of the contribution to "the project".

So, if Matrix is (a) developed openly, allowing contributions from anyone, and (b) doesn't require the signing of a bullshit CLA, I think it's fine.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Ha! I wrote it! Well the original anyway. It's been forked a few times since I stepped away.

So yeah, I think it's pretty cool 😆

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Actually, I stepped away from the project 'cause I stopped using it altogether. I started the project to satisfy the British government with their ridiculous requirements for proof of my relationship with my wife so I could live here. Once I was settled though and didn't need to be able to bring up flight itineraries from 5 years ago, it stopped being something I needed.

Well that, and lemme tell you, maintaining a popular Free software project is HARD. Everyone has an idea of where stuff should go, but most of the contributions come in piecemeal, so you're left mostly acting as the one trying to wrangle different styles and architectures into something cohesive... while you're also holding down a day job. It was stressful to say the least, and with a kid on the way, something had to give.

But every once in a while I consider installing paperless-ngx just to see how it's come along, and how much has changed. I'm absolutely delighted that it's been running and growing in my absence, and from the screenshots alone, I see that a lot of the ideas people had when I was helming made it in in the end.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Thanks! The crazy thing is that it's really not that complicated. I'd say the hardest work was in writing the docs :-). It's awesome to hear that people still use it and love it though.

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

Aww! Thank you! It was fun ❤️

danielquinn ,
@danielquinn@lemmy.ca avatar

42,396 installs.... Holy shit.

Edit, from the article:

This “Exodus” application published in the Snap store was indeed a scam application. There is a genuine organisation that developed a real, seemingly ’legitimate’ cryptocurrency wallet application. This is not that.

Any chance that the FlatHub one is legit?

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