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TheVulgarTongue Bot

@TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us

Bot account posting selections from Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue”

CW: 18th-century levels of racism, homophobia, sexism, slut-shaming and negative attitudes to sex workers.

But on the other hand, someone non-judgmentally recorded the speech and codes of people on the outside of polite society, people in the demi-monde and otherwise forgotten by history.

Let me know of any problems.

#books #literature #dictionaries #history #society #crime #language #slang #18thCentury

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TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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HAMS, or HAMCASES Breeches.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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INEXPRESSIBLES. Breeches.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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HAVY CAVY. Wavering, doubtful, shilly shally.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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COD. A cod of money: a good sum of money.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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CONGER. To conger; the agreement of a set or knot of booksellers of London, that whosoever of them shall buy a good copy, the rest shall take off such a particular number, in quires, at a stated price; also booksellers joining to buy either a considerable or dangerous copy.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    MOPED. Stupid, melancholy for want of society.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BO-PEEP. One who sometimes hides himself, and sometimes appears publicly abroad, is said to-play at bo-peep. Also one who lies perdue, or on the watch.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BIBLE. A boatswain's great axe. Sea term.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    CURSITORS. Broken petty-fogging attornies, or Newgate solicitors. CANT.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    CHIVING LAY. Cutting the braces of coaches behind, on which the coachman quitting the box, an accomplice robs the boot; also, formerly, cutting the back of the coach to steal the fine large wigs then worn.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    CHEEKS. Ask cheeks near cunnyborough; the repartee of a St. Gilese's fair one, who bids you ask her backside, anglice her arse.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BASTARDLY GULLION. A bastard's bastard.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    NUG. An endearing word: as, My dear nug; my dear love.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    LANTHORN-JAWED. Thin-visaged: from their cheeks being almost transparent. Or else, lenten jawed; i.e. having the jaws of one emaciated by a too rigid observation of Lent. Dark lanthorn; a servant or agent at court, who receives a bribe for his principal or master.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    SCRIP. A scrap or slip of paper. The cully freely blotted the scrip, and tipt me forty hogs; the man freely signed the bond, and gave me forty shillings.--Scrip is also a Change Alley phrase for the last loan or subscription.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    TO RUB. To run away. Don't rub us to the whit; don't send us to Newgate. CANT.--To rub up; to refresh: to rub up one's memory. A rub: an impediment. A rubber; the best two out of three. To win a rubber: to win two games out of three.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    JORUM. A jugg, or large pitcher.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    COCK OF THE COMPANY. A weak man, who from the desire of being the head of the company associates with low people, and pays all the reckoning.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BLOCK HOUSES. Prisons, houses of correction, &c.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    FIGGER. A little boy put in at a window to hand out goods to the diver. See DIVER.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    GENTLEMAN'S MASTER. A highway robber, because he makes a gentleman obey his commands, i.e. stand and deliver.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    DANDY. That’s the dandy; i.e. the ton, the clever thing; an expression of similar import to “That’s the barber.” See BARBER.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    TEMPLE PICKLING. Pumping a bailiff; a punishment formerly administered to any of that fraternity caught exercising their functions within the limits of Temple.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    FORLORN HOPE. A gamester's last stake.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BAY FEVER. A term of ridicule applied to convicts, who sham illness, to avoid being sent to Botany Bay.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BALDERDASH. Adulterated wine.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    FEN. A bawd, or common prostitute. CANT.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    FOOL. A fool at the end of a stick; a fool at one end, and a maggot at the other; gibes on an angler.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    MEMBER MUG. A chamber pot.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    MARTINET. A military term for a strict disciplinarian: from the name of a French general, famous for restoring military discipline to the French army. He first disciplined the French infantry, and regulated their method of encampment.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    TO PATTER. To talk. To patter flash; to speak flash, or the language used by thieves. How the blowen lushes jackey, and patters flash; how the wench drinks gin, and talks flash.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    CHATES. The gallows. CANT.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue OP Bot ,
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    @Cameleopard @sewblue @histodons It's more functional than simply slang, but yes. It's the private language or jargon of a sub-culture. You most often see "Thieves Cant", criminals of course have good reason to obscure what they're talking about.

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    MOB; or MAB. A wench, or harlot.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BULL CALF. A great hulkey or clumsy fellow. See HULKEY.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    CAW-HANDED, or CAW-PAWED. Awkward, not dextrous, ready, or nimble.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    FOGUS. Tobacco. Tip me a gage of fogus; give me a pipe of tobacco. CANT.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    ANCHOR. Bring your arse to an anchor, i.e. sit down. To let go an anchor to the windward of the law; to keep within the letter of the law. SEA WIT.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BLEATING RIG. Sheep stealing. Cant.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    To LINE. A term for the act of coition between dog and bitch.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    MIDSHIPMAN'S WATCH AND CHAIN. A sheep's heart and pluck.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    @histodons

    TheVulgarTongue OP Bot ,
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    @tomstewart @histodons
    "Pluck" here refers to internal organs/offal:

    TheVulgarTongue OP Bot ,
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    @sewblue @Z_Zed_Zed @tomstewart @histodons
    Sometimes what's most interesting is how common the terms are nowadays. Something Grose wrote down as obscure slang in its day but is natural today. For instance “Honeymoon”.

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    BLUE DEVILS. Low spirits.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    HUNCH-BACKED. Hump-backed.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    TIT. A horse; a pretty little tit; a smart little girl. a *** or tid bit; a delicate morsel. Tommy tit; a smart lively little fellow.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    DEVIL CATCHER, or DEVIL DRIVER. A parson. See SNUB DEVIL.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    DEUSEA VILLE STAMPERS. Country carriers. Cant.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    @histodons

    TheVulgarTongue OP Bot ,
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    @histodons
    I tried to do a little research on this one: “DEUSEA VILLE” means “the country”?

    Anyway Google is featuring this bot right there on the front page, so that's nice. If not very helpful.

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