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Sal

@Sal@mander.xyz

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Sal Mod , (edited )
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Awesome! The one with the sustained source loop is my favorite:

https://mander.xyz/pictrs/image/684c5215-1be3-4537-8100-11c33a374656.png

Also, the one that shoots out flames paints a picture similar to how a synchrotron behaves, shooting out X-rays into the beamlines as the electron bunches move around.

https://mander.xyz/pictrs/image/b7870ecb-bd83-4506-a303-0ac20bc61ecd.png

https://mander.xyz/pictrs/image/897baadc-dddc-4759-89ae-d58ba42873df.png

Upon looking into it closer, the synchrotron is a bit of a mixture of those two concepts - the source loop (booster ring) that is fed by the linear accelerator, and then the larger loop (storage room) that feeds X-rays the beamlines. Of course, many details differ, but still it is interesting to notice the similarities !

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

If the timing is right, I would bring a mushroom grow bag with mushrooms sprouting.

If not... probably my radiacode gamma spectrometer and some of my radioactive items. Maybe a clock with radium painted dials and a piece of trinitite. I think that there are many different points of discussion that can be of interest to a broad audience (radioactivity, spectroscopy, electronics, US labor law story of the radium girls, nuclear explosions, background radiation.... etc). As a bonus I can bring a UV flash light and show the radium fluorescence. Adults love UV flash lights.

Sal Mod ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I think that they are referring to Paxillus involotus

It is quite an interesting mushroom. It was considered "safe to eat" for a long time, but it contains an antigen that a human's immune system can learn to attack.

The antigen is still of unknown structure but it stimulates the formation of IgG antibodies in the blood serum.

I once looked into whether this immune response builds up over many exposures, or if it is a random event that has a probability of happening for each exposure. I don't remember finding a convincing answer... If it is a random event, then mushroom could be considered a "Russian roulette" mushroom that will usually provide a nice meal, but, if unlucky, you may experience the following:

Poisoning symptoms are rapid in onset, consisting initially of vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and associated decreased blood volume. Shortly after these initial symptoms appear, hemolysis develops, resulting in reduced urine output, hemoglobin in the urine or outright absence of urine formation, and anemia. Hemolysis may lead to numerous complications including acute kidney injury, shock, acute respiratory failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. These complications can cause significant morbidity with fatalities having been reported.

I agree with you that this is probably unrelated to the "generally similar to humans" comment. I feel like this fantasy is a combination of the above fact mixed in with the fact that the Fungi belong to the Opisthokonts, which places them closer to animals than plants, and so they share some interesting cellular characteristics with us. This places them closer to animals than plants, but "generally similar to humans" is perhaps a bit of a stretch ^_^

But, it is just a meme about a guy being hyped about mushrooms. Hopefully people don't expect memes to be super accurate 😁

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Dragonfruit lemonade (agua de pitahaya) is delicious!

The Terrifying A.I. Scam That Uses Your Loved One’s Voice: A couple in the U.S. got a call from relatives who were being held ransom. Their voices—like many others these days—had been cloned ( www.newyorker.com )

Artificial Intelligence is revolutionizing seemingly every aspect of our lives: medical diagnosis, weather forecasting, space exploration, and even mundane tasks like writing e-mails and searching the Internet. But with increased efficiencies and computational accuracy has come a Pandora’s box of trouble.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I have heard of scams like this one happening to people I know for many years now in Mexico, but without AI. In its most basic form the scammer does not need to know who they are calling, because the scam relies largely in volume and the psychology of fear.

The victim picks up, someome screams something along the lines of 'mom/dad please help', and then the "kidnapper" takes the phone away and says that they have taken their daughter/son hostage and that they must not hang up the phone. They do this to several numbers until someone takes the bait and freaks out, often revealing additional information (like their kid's name) in the process.

With AI the scammer could spend the time and collect information to make the scam more believable. But I don't think that the voice is the bottleneck for these scams. Those who have experienced this (including my mom, uncle, grandma, and acquaintances) say that in the moment of shock they really do believe they hear the voice of their family member.

The AI method makes a more sophisticated class of these attacks easier to perform, but it is still a sophisticated attack that requires gathering data, and the execution will still require some form of a performance. Or... At least that's what I think

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

First of all, congratulations for bringing a baby girl into this world!! You must be really excited! I am very happy for you!

This looks very cool. I set up a wiki (https://ibis.mander.xyz/) and I will make an effort to populate it with some Lemmy lore and interesting science/tech 😄 Hopefully I can set some time aside and help with a tiny bit of code too.

Sal Mod ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

As someone who grew up in the tropics and now lives somewhere colder, I went through the first three table entries thinking that this was Celsius and felt understood.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Thank you for the positivity 💚 I wholeheartedly agree!

Drama and negativity drives engagement, and this form of engagement can easily trigger a feedback loop in which negativity keeps piling on and voices of support are practically muted.

We are participating in an open source project that has some very ambitious goals. Things can be messy, mistakes happen, there are risks, and people have many different opinions and moods. Heated discussions can be a healthy part of the process. But, once the dust is allowed to settle for a bit, it is good to remember that we are humans and that we are here because we have some shared goals.

I think the majority of people around here are kind and have a positive outlook, but perhaps it is more motivating to speak out when we have negative comments than positive ones. So, thank you for taking the time to write this positive message!

Sal Mod ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Woah - I had never heard of the Hatzegopteryx. I spent some time today watching videos of this guy today (and its relatives, Quetzalcoatlus and Argentinosaurus). They are really cool.

I know that there is a lot of arguments about what dinosaurs actually looked like - I hope that in the videos they make these guys scarier than they actually were... This video is especially: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYniD_MQ7Rg

Personally, this style (from a great PBS Eons video) is my favorite interpretation:

https://i.imgur.com/Hptc0jc.png

https://arbordalekids.files.wordpress.com/2021/11/ihatz_09_soar.jpg

And artists apparently like to emphasize that these guys could eat small dinosaurs!

https://i.imgur.com/C6gZxgn.png

https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/624b94e0a1971679b2a1d8da/1658165737287-UB7NR8B4IE0N5HVFTW5X/pablo-rivera-hatzegopteryx.jpg

https://a-z-animals.com/media/2022/06/shutterstock_1362863072-768x461.jpg

https://d.furaffinity.net/art/renfriammon/1704472255/1704472255.renfriammon_img_4649.png

https://image.pbs.org/video-assets/5kg0O0I-asset-mezzanine-16x9-RIS0K1C.png

Sal Mod ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I am going to be that guy and point out that pterosaurs were not dinosaurs, unless you consider primates to be squirrels cause we are distantly related.

Ah, thank you for being that guy! Now I know 😄

Also fun fact pterosaurs may have had a type of feathering which either means that the ancestors of both dinosaurs and pterosaurs had feathers or it evolved at least twice. And on a similar thing of body coverings, stem mamals/proto-mammals had fur before the dinosaurs ever evolved.

Can the feathers and fur (or their impression) be preserved for millions of years in some types of fossilization? Or is the presence of these concluded from the bone structures, fossilized skin, or other not so direct pieces of evidence? And, is any direct evidence of color preserved? No pressure to answer, I am just wondering out loud.

Sal Mod ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Thanks! I can imagine preserving a feather for 65 millions of years is no easy feat.

[Urgent] How do you know your computer or phone isn't spying on you ?

This maybe a dumb question but i became paranoid all of a sudden and wanted some answers because i can't find it anywhere else nor can i sleep without it. Like even if i did flash linux on a lets say amd laptop couldn't the chip itself be spying on me ? Also i understand bootloaders are stored or rom is there a way to know what...

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I am also quite interested in this. It is not something that keeps me awake at night, and I am not particularly paranoid about it. But I find that working towards answering this question is a fun frame from which to learn about electronics, radio communications, and networking.

Since this appears to be something that is causing you some anxiety, I think it is better if I start by giving you some reassurance in that I have not yet managed to prove that any electronic device is spying on me via a hidden chip. I don't think it is worth being paranoid about this.

I can explain some things that could be done to test whether a Linux computer spying. I am not suggesting that you try any of this. I am explaining this to you so that you can get some reassurance in the fact that, if devices were spying on us in this manner, it is likely that someone would have noticed by now.

The "spy" chip needs some way to communicate. One way a chip might communicate is via radio waves. So, the first step would be to remove the WiFi and Bluetooth dongles and any other pieces of hardware that may emit radio waves during normal operation. There is a tool called a "Spectrum Analyzer" that can be used to capture the presence of specific radio frequencies. These devices are now relatively affordable, like the tinySA, which can measure the presence of radio frequencies of up to 6 GHz.

One can make a Faraday cage, for example, by wrapping the PC with a copper-nickel coated polyester fabric to isolate the PC from the radio waves that are coming from the environment. The spectrum analyzer antennas can be placed right next to the PC and the device is left to measure continuously over several days. A script can monitor the output and keep a record of any RF signals.

Since phones are small, it is even easier to wrap them in the copper-nickel polyester fabric alongside with the spectrum analyzer antenna to check whether they emit any RF when they are off or in airplane mode with the WiFi and Bluetooth turned off.

What this experiment may allow you to conclude is that the spy chip is not communicating frequently with the external world via radio frequencies, at least not with frequencies <= 6 GHz.

Using frequencies higher 6 GHz for a low-power chip is not going be an effective method of transmitting a signal very far away. The chip could remain hidden and only emit the signal under certain rare conditions, or in response to a trigger. We can't rule that out with this experiment, but it is unlikely.

A next step would be to test a wired connection. It could be that the spy chip can transmit the data over the internet. One can place a VPN Gateway in between their PC and the router, and use that gateway to route all the traffic to their own server using WireGuard. All network packets that leave through the PC's ethernet connection can be captured and examined this way using Wireshark or tcpdump.

If one can show that the device is not secretly communicating via RF nor via the internet, I think it is unlikely that the device is spying on them.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Search engines like google aggregate data from multiple sites. I may want to download a datasheet for an electronic component, find an answer to a technical question, find a language learning course site, or look for museums in my area.

Usually I make specific searches with very specific conditions, so I tend to get few and relevant results. I think search engines have their place.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

You can take a lot of control by using search commands. Here is a list of commands for Google, for example: https://www.lifewire.com/advanced-google-search-3482174

By using commands like these you can narrow down your searches to the point that the impact of SEO is small. You give a much greater weight to the conditions that you have chosen.

It can be a bit of work to write a good search query, but the database that search engines search through is massive, so it makes sense that it would take some work to do this right.

Sal Mod ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Essentially, yes.

Whether the term "molecule" technically includes or excludes a piece of metal is a bit more tricky. I lean towards "no" more than "yes" because there are some important differences between what we generally call a "molecule" and how we think about a glassy or a crystalline solid. But I think both positions are arguable. If we are not being pedantic, then essentially yeah.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I don't have much of an opinion on this topic, I haven't really looked into it.

But as soon as I saw this image, the El Al Flight 1862 which crashed in the Bijlmer in Amsterdam in 1992 immediately came to mind. The shape of the hole is very similar!

https://www.kijkmagazine.nl/app/uploads/sites/3/2019/10/Bijlmerramp.jpg

This image shows the likely position of the Bijlmer plane during the crash:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/12/Bijlmer_crash_impact_model.TIF/lossy-page1-1390px-Bijlmer_crash_impact_model.TIF.jpg

The image you posted of the Pentagon seems to me consistent with what I have seen of the Bijlmer accident, and so the shape of the hole and the absence of wings in the photo does not persuade me personally that no plane was involved.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Fair enough. I just looked it up and if the scale in this image is correct, I agree that the size of the hole looks small in comparison. I also looked at the security video of the crash itself and it is frustrating how little we can see from it.

https://mander.xyz/pictrs/image/6d4db3da-2bbe-49f2-89fe-ce271328bd6b.png

Since this was such an important event and there seems to be a lack of specific pieces of essential evidence - either because of bad luck or because of a cover-up - I understand the skepticism. And I am not a fan of blindly believing any official narrative. But, without any context, if I see that photo and someone tells me that a plane crashed into that building, I would find it probable simply because the shape is so similar to the photo of the Bijlmer accident that I'm familiar with. A plane crash seems to me like a very chaotic process, so I don't have a good expectation of what the damage should look like.

Maybe I'll look for a pentagon crash documentary some time.

Sal OP Mod ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Oh... Wow!

I recently noticed that one of my blog posts sneaked into the results of Google Scholar.

Now that you mentioned this, I checked whether my blog post shows up in the papers that I cited... And it does. It is being counted as a citation.

I guess I have accidentally stumbled into the recipe to fool Google Scholar. Crazy.

Thanks for pointing that out!!

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

If carbon dioxide (CO2) simply absorbed energy, including sunlight, without re-emitting it, it could lead to cooling at the Earth’s surface. This is because the absorbed energy would not be radiated back to the surface, resulting in a net loss of energy from the Earth-atmosphere system.

Hmm, I don't follow the argument. If the CO2 and other atmospheric molecules were unable to re-emit the light, they would need to dissipate the excess energy via non-radiative processes. So the main transfer of energy to the surroundings would be via collisions with other molecules. The density of molecules is greater as you approach the surface, and the density in space is very very low. So there are many more molecules to collide with that move the energy in the direction of the surface, and there is no easy pathway to get the heat out of the earth, other than hot molecules diffusing into space.

So, unless there is an important hole in my reasoning, removing the radiative pathway would ultimately result in a hotter earth because a larger percentage of the energy of light is trapped.

I think that the main problem in your comment is that it does not account for what happens to the energy that is absorbed. This energy does not disappear - you need to account for it.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Ah, I see what you mean.

The experiment showed that the CO2 gas was an efficient absorber of some form of radiant energy that came from the sun. We now know that this energy is infrared radiation. This radiation is emitted by hot bodies, and the sun emits a lot of it.

But yes, you are correct in that her experiment was not about the greenhouse effect itself - which includes more complicated interactions such as the reflection and emission of IR from the earth's surface. But, still, the absorption of IR by CO2 is a very important component. And her observations - using the sun as the source of the infrared - is also a very relevant observation. This is because:

  • Infrared light can carry heat energy from one hot body to another
  • A large amount of the heat transfer from the sun to the earth comes in the form of infrared light
  • CO2, which is present in the atmosphere in a significant amount, is a strong absorber of infrared light

So I don't think her work is irrelevant. It is very relevant. But I do think that the title "Scientists understood physics of climate change" is stretched because this experiment by itself is not enough to describe all of the complexity of the green house effect and climate change.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

Is the fact that I recognize this comment evidence that I use Lemmy a bit too much? 😅

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I made the switch when I got a new phone. So I kept both the old phone with android and the new phone with GrapheneOS. There was a transition period when I would bring both phones with me, just in case. Now my old phone is my "whatsapp" phone which I keep at home and turn on rarely. During the transition period I used my old phone number whenever I needed to provide my phone to use a service, but eventually I transitioned that to a VoIP. But, even then, many services will reject VoIP phone numbers, so I still make use of the old one.

I had to request a special scanner from my bank because the banking apps do not work with GrapheneOS. And I had to make sure that nothing important goes into my gmail anymore because google would request that I used my old phone 2FA in the most inconvenient moments, and also I don't want to access google from my GrapheneOS phone.

I think that there are many annoyances that can and probably will happen if you try to jump right into GrapheneOS after having previously relied in the google/meta ecosystem. If you attempt to switch too quickly you might inadvertently lose access to your bank, and you might become suddenly unable to communicate with family and friends. My government's online identification system requires that I use their app, which runs on google services, so I still have to use my old phone for that. And I have encountered situations in which the only reasonably convenient way to proceed is to download an app. For example, recently I registered for a gym that would then require me to use their google-store app so that I could identify myself when purchasing a physical card.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I think that it works, but for it to work you need to enable Google Play services. From what I understand, this is done in a sandboxed manner simulating a fake identity, so it is possible to do this while isolating Google from your phone to an extent. But I think that WhatsApp is in itself problematic and one of the direct offenders that I want to avoid, regardless of its reliance on Google Play services, and so I have not gone through this effort myself.

Sal ,
@Sal@mander.xyz avatar

I am not sure as I did not test this one. Maybe you can go in person and get a worker to get you access to the kiosk through your account to print the card. It is one of those massive chains with gyms in every corner. I think that by now they rely on their digital infrastructure and many of their workers are not trained to handle uncommon situations. At least I get that from some of my experiences, but I could be wrong, maybe if I would have called them could have helped me with this. It was just easier to get the app into my old phone, print a card, delete the app.

[Thread, post or comment was deleted by the author]

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  • Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    Do you see a random nickname from a stranger, or a nickname of an account that was previously logged into using the same computer?

    What is an open account sharing channel?

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    I think we might see one or more “trusted fediverse” groups emerge in the next few years, with instance admins making commitments to security controls, moderation, code of conduct, etc.

    There is now at least one system in place for admins to vouch for other instances being non-malicious, and to report suspected instances. It is called the fediseer: https://gui.fediseer.com/

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    I will also pay close attention and see if I can catch that happening.

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    Yes, you are right. If a mod wants I can send them the username and they can ban them from the community. I can see it as an admin from my instance but I can't take action.

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    There is one account that has a single comment from 5 months ago that is downvoting most posts and comments. That one is very suspicious

    Other than that... No other accounts are as obvious. A few do have some reoccurrences but most of those votes do seem organic on first inspection.

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    A botnet could have many unique accounts, and some could even appear like users. So I can't rule it out. I also haven't done a deeper dive into the accounts.

    But when a post gets popular I would expect it to get at least a few downvotes, regardless of what it is.

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    And the audacity to talk about metadata when Telegram accounts still require a phone number today (as they did five years ago when this post was written) is just… 🤯

    Not only that, but I believe that they actively try to prevent VoIP numbers from being used to create accounts.

    I have an issue with how SIM cards are handled in most countries

    Almost all countries require official authentication to activate a SIM card. This seems to me as a huge privacy problem, if the country can track sim cards across cell towers and connect them to a person. It seems like a dystopian system, that we litterely can not hide from our governments without turning off our smartphones....

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    Almost all countries require official authentication to activate a SIM card.

    Fortunately not in the Netherlands. I don't think that's the case in the rest of the EU. I can use free sim cards as much as I want!

    When communicating with cell towers, a phone will also broadcast its unique IMEI identifier. So, even if you swap the SIM card every day, your IMEI is still being broadcast the same.

    Changing the IMEI of a phone in the EU is illegal, unless the manufacturer consents: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2002/31/section/1

    So... I have a Chinese 4G mobile router, and the manufacturer gives me the permission to change the IMEI as it is an integrated feature of the device. I use that for my data. The data codes I purchase small quantities in bulk with cash, and I can access the router via its ip from my phone's browser to send the SMS messages to activate the data codes as needed. Since WiFi connections are abundant around here I keep these codes for emergencies. I can go a few months some time without activating data codes. I mostly use them when traveling internationally.

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    I have the Tianje MF903 (https://nl.aliexpress.com/item/32719535459.html), which I bought early 2022.

    But just now I have done a search and I see many more pocket wifi routers now. Unfortunately I can't tell you if they work well, or if it is also possible to change their IMEI easily. The one I have is functional, but it doesn't have a very long battery life.

    Sal , (edited )
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    I can tell you one benefit: Money. Most of my server's costs come from storing federated content. Federating with threads would likely be expensive.

    Sal , (edited )
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    I ordered four of the simpler devices this weekend (LilyGO T3-S3 LoRa 868MHz - SX1262) and I have been reading about antennas.

    Since I live in a city I am not super optimistic about the range. But I am still very curious about the concept, and I would love to be surprised.

    After doing some search about antennas, I have decided to test the following combination:

    I also have a vector network analyzer (LiteVNA) that can be used for checking antennas, so I will also try to build some antennas myself. I doubt that my custom antennas will approach the performance of the professional ones... But I just find it such a cool concept.

    Have you already gotten to play with it? What is your experience so far?

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    Ah, cool! I got my 4 devices today and I have managed to play with them a bit. They are pretty cool! I was able to walk over to a park near my house and spoke with people across the world with no data in my phone :D

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    Sure.

    If I make my own AI image generator and create a nice image with it, or use some AI engine that gives me full ownership of the output, I can choose to share it online with whatever license I want to share it with. I don’t see why the regular copyright rules for digital images and photographs would not hold… If someone shares their AI creation online and wants others to share with attribution, or not share at all, what is wrong with that?

    I can take a ton of photos of objects with my phone, upload them to Flickr, and they are all copyrighted. That doesn’t mean that other’s can simply take similar photos if they wish to do so. The same with AI. One can decide whether to share with attribution, pay someone to let them use it, or to generate the image themselves using AI. It does not seem like a problem to me.

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    I can’t reproduce that. And I don’t see any indication of any connection to yandex through the inspector when I go to kbin.social.

    Could it be that you have some malware installed in your PC? Have you seen this or similar download pop-ups in other sites?

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    Ah! I checked with my phone and I see this:

    https://mander.xyz/pictrs/image/e288a142-3eb4-42f7-b575-089f277cc24d.png

    Maybe this pop up shows up like that to you?

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    But did you also see this pop-up? What I am thinking is that maybe your phone processed it diferently

    Sal ,
    @Sal@mander.xyz avatar

    I’m glad you could figure it out!

    I followed the link and I see that network request too. I downloaded the file and it is the video.

    https://mander.xyz/pictrs/image/4a0d625c-cd14-40b5-8afe-932cbb95d645.png

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