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GrittyLipids

@GrittyLipids@c.im

I read a lot, listen to a lot of podcasts, watch cartoons and (frequently cheesy) movies.

I speak a few different languages besides English.

Otherwise I'm around. I think the land I live on used to belong to the Nacotchtank but I'm not sure. He/him.

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GrittyLipids , to histodon group
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I forgot how much I hated the sound of that fucking idiot fake cowboy’s voice. Rich bitch from New England playing at being a working class Texan. That’s not even considering his stupid pablum bullshit about sensing Putin’s soul.

Also this doc has gone well off the rails of history and into modern information campaign stuff. No mention of red mercury, no mention of the IMF/World Bank, no shock here.

@histodon

GrittyLipids , to histodon group
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I’m glad they’re talking about the certificate scam in ‘90s Russia, but something tells me they aren’t going to talk about the American role in forcing that asinine bullshit through the IMF and World Bank.


@histodon

GrittyLipids , to histodons group
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I never realized how close the Kurils are to Japan. Leaving aside, y’know, all of Russian and Japanese history prior to 1945, no wonder the Americans were so keen on becoming friends with Japan after the war.

Even if we definitely should have insisted on more trials of murderers and criminals like Shiro Ishii.

@histodons




GrittyLipids OP ,
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@histodons

Although hey, way to whitewash an absolute fucking maniac by not pointing out how Larry McDonald was the head of the JBS. The JBS being the infamously insane pack of dipshit morons who accused Eisenhower and Nixon of being secret Communists.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@histodons

And give away the American bias of this documentary by not mentioning how preceded or how it completely fucking shattered the minds of everyone in the UK.


GrittyLipids OP ,
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GrittyLipids , to histodons group
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Ah, ~52 minutes in and we’re getting to the Wunderwaffe fears. Feels like I shouldn’t # that.




@histodons

GrittyLipids , to histodon group
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Watching the BBC documentary on via . Transparently obvious that this was made because of , but at the same time it’s an interesting overview of Einstein’s life between exile from Germany and turning up in the US.

I also thought they were taking liberties with his voice until they showed a clip of the real Einstein speaking. Turns out not so much, though I kinda want to watch more of that now.

@histodon

GrittyLipids , to histodon group
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Asante Gold: UK to loan back Ghana's looted 'crown jewels'

That’s interesting.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-68066877

@histodon

GrittyLipids , to Random
@GrittyLipids@c.im avatar

Went to the African-American history and culture museum yesterday - everyone should. Despite what I imagine some people believe, it’s not just violence and trauma porn, it’s a lot of day to day normal stuff on the upper floors. My wife wondered where the slavery and Jim Crow stuff was, but it occurred to me that it would probably be concentrated somewhere else in the building - excessive focus on slavery and trauma is a complaint I’ve heard about cultural stuff usual made for white audiences.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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Who wants their entire identity defined by violence? The upper floors mention it (Tulsa 1921, Chicago 1919, Fort Pillow massacre, Angola prison in Louisiana, etc) but there’s a lot more stuff about everyday life, including Robert Churchwell - that guy was the first Black reporter to work in a major white paper in the South, which much have required self control few people have. The Olympics guys have their own statue, and so do the Williams sisters.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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We came in a bit late, so we didn’t get a chance to see everything, but we got into a good bit of the dark stuff in the basement. I didn’t know but wasn’t surprised to find out that Denmark was involved in the slave trade - they used to own St Croix and a couple other Caribbean islands they sold to the US at some point, which seems to be when they got out of the slave trade, at least in the US.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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Probably the most informative exhibit (“favorite” sounds wrong) was the segregated train car. You really get a sense of how petty and cheap the racists were - the Black bathrooms are tiny (about the size of airplane ones now), white ones have a “lounge” area, which is weird, but regardless of how weird it was they had more space. Plus you couldn’t use the suitcase storage areas unless you were white, which is just ridiculous.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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If I get a chance to go back I’ll have to see if they’ve got a Wilmington 1898 exhibit and what they have about COINTELPRO-related fuckery. Probably the single most horrifying thing in there is the child-sized shackles, but there’s also plenty of stuff in there that isn’t evil or soaked in blood.


@histodon

Likewise , to bookstodon group
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In case anyone is wondering if there is any engagement on here— this is the list of every book recommended after I asked if you’d share one book you enjoyed this year. You can scroll underneath the original post to see these, but I think seeing them all together shows the true awesomeness of the people on here.

Thanks for being pretty darn great ❤️
@bookstodon

A continuation of the handwritten list of all the books recommended.

GrittyLipids ,
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@bookstodon @Likewise @firefly

I’ll have to look into that. Sci-fi is sci-fi but early sci-fi is more impressive for the track it laid for its followers.

GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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Reading Chip War and it’s interesting how American companies did the same thing with semiconductors and Japan that they later did with China and everything else - just the racist assumption that nobody in those countries would ever figure out how to duplicate and then improve upon their technology.

Japan doesn’t seem to have been as openly theft-oriented as China, but they weren’t above corporate espionage shenaniganry.



@bookstodon

GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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You know you’re reading peak DC fiction when the what-if thriller features an important scene centered on Pentagon budgetary hearings with Senators.



@bookstodon

GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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If they ever make a movie out of Night Of Camp David, Bruce Greenwood would make a solid Hollenbach.


@bookstodon

GrittyLipids , to histodons group
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Started reading Stratigakos’ book about the Nazi occupation of Norway and its influence on Norwegian infrastructure. Now I’m curious how much Norwegian infrastructure is still based on stuff the Nazis built and how much that affects Norway’s economy. Not like they should go back and demolish those roads or anything, but I’m curious.


@bookstodon
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GrittyLipids , to histodons group
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I never would have imagined any part of the NBP to have been performance art or the prelude to bands like Pussy Riot before reading Fenghi’s book on them. It’s also somewhat surprising and unsurprising that the post-Soviet political protest space was taken up with Nazi imagery, since that was probably the most offensive collection of symbols available to recent Soviets.

@bookstodon
@histodons

GrittyLipids OP ,
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GrittyLipids OP ,
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@bookstodon @histodons @julieofthespirits

I thought this was going to be more of a political history than basically an art critique. My eyes glazed over a few times at some of this, but it does an adequate job of explaining how post-Soviet artists and poets enabled Dugin’s fascist movement. Also does a good job of explaining what Dugin actually is, versus what Americans want to think he is.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@histodons @julieofthespirits @bookstodon

Plus it lays out how neither the NBP nor Dugin’s movement really have an ideology for constructive purposes, instead of nebulous protest. The one area I wanted to see more of was how the Kremlin decided to pick up Dugin and his ideology, but I suspect there’s no way the author could have gotten that information. Did they hollow out his ideas for their own purposes or did he adapt as needed?

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@julieofthespirits @bookstodon @histodons

Yeah, the Americans who keep trying to turn him into Rasputin are wrong. It’s obvious he doesn’t control the Russian government, it’s more that he says things Putin finds useful right now. He’s been saying stuff like this for 25+ years, but it’s only recently that Putin seems to have gone all in on trying to rebuild the USSR.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@histodons @julieofthespirits @bookstodon

Gotta say I wasn’t happy to see that racist fraud mentioned in this book, but it was in passing and doesn’t seem to have been a huge influence.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@julieofthespirits @histodons @bookstodon @valeg

Being an ideologue isn’t the same thing as being the cartoon puppetmaster controlling the government, though, which is what a lot of Americans incorrectly keep saying he is.

GrittyLipids , to histodons group
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So in Confederation America (1780s) there was the Anarchiad, a satiric epic poem that for the most part is tedious because I’m not into that kind of literature.

However, there are chunks of it motivated by extremely Confederation problems, like fighting over whether or not paper money should be accepted and/or states should be able to issue their own.

@histodons
@bookstodon

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/a/amverse/BAD5699.0001.001?rgn=main;view=fulltext

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@histodons @bookstodon

Also there’s also some stuff about states not wanting to accept each other’s funbux and calling each other thieves, plus doing trade war shit to each other.

On top of the existing history this helps highlight the extent to which the Confederation was a terrible idea. On the one hand nobody likes a tyrant, on the other hand you can’t run a country like this unless you want nonstop chaos and internecine violence.



GrittyLipids OP ,
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@histodons @bookstodon

It’s also significant that the racist traitors in the 1860s tried to do something like the Confederation (hence Confederacy) and immediately ran into a bunch of the same problems, like not being able to effectively fight a war against a more centralized enemy while also not having coherent national policy because your ideology demands decentralization.

They learned nothing, which tracks.



GrittyLipids OP ,
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@stephenwhq @histodons @bookstodon

Also that. Contrary to what every slackjaw and every Uptown Klansman tries to tell everyone, the foundation of the Confederacy was slavery, full stop, period. They would never get rid of it voluntarily - even if agricultural prices cratered the rich would undoubtedly have held onto their house slaves and skilled craftsman slaves as long as they possibly could. What were the whites going to do, wash their own clothes?

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@stephenwhq @histodons @BertL @bookstodon

Yeah, I grew up in the South and I still sometimes argue with/yell at lost cause dumbfucks for being idiot racists and liars, because that’s what they are.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@histodons @extralongdivision @stephenwhq @BertL @bookstodon

Yeah, that’s one of their other favorite lies/whataboutisms. The North definitely had ethical issues with refining/manufacturing the stuff produced by slaves, but they weren’t running a race-based rape, terror and murder economy like the South was.

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@BertL @stephenwhq @histodons @cturnbow @bookstodon

They really hate it when you quote the primary source at them because of how it deflates all of their bullshit at once.

GrittyLipids , to histodons group
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@histodons @HistoryToday @bookstodon

Does anyone have a recommendation on American national-level political and legal history in the 1780s? I have Morris’ book from the 1980s, but his writing style is a little weird and some of his thoughts are at best “of their time” in not putting serious thought into the role of non-white people and women of every color at the time, at least in terms of how their actions helped frame national issues and decisions.

GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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Started reading a random compilation of 1969-70 short stories that I bought while trying to keep in business during the worst of the - first one in the collection has the main character being a professional puppy murderer as a child, and being essentially a pathological killer while also being a hero and the ideal military officer. He also thought he killed an angel.

I don’t know who Howard Fast is but he has issues.

@bookstodon

GrittyLipids OP ,
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@mbmorgan @bookstodon

The Crossing Series sounds familiar.

GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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Started reading Morris’ book on the 1780s - it was written in the 1980s and really shows its age in only kinda-sorta treating non-white people as fully human when asking questions like “was this area actually inhabited” or “how many people weren’t Protestant”.

It does kind of ask some of those questions, but probably not in as much detail as a bunch of historians would ask today. I’m reading this for political history, but still.


@bookstodon
@histodons

GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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I didn’t know the had anything to do with the Crimean War until today, but apparently they sent troops too.

And also a Russian general named Khrulev proposed blowing up the city of Sevastopol and then doing a mass suicide charge into the allied positions, with the attitude of “Let everybody die! We will leave our mark upon the map!”


@histodons
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GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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Russian electrical sea mines in 1854 sound like one of the most insanely dangerous things ever made, second only to Russian chemical sea mines from the same year.


@histodons
@bookstodon

GrittyLipids , to bookstodon group
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Yikes, the British army was actually more barbaric to its own soldiers in Crimea than Russia was. The Russians had a guy who basically invented battlefield medical triage and promoted the use of ether as an anesthetic (Pirogov, who I’d never heard of before now), while the British were like “I don’t approve of this newfangled ether idea, you should cut them without it and hear the scream, that’s so much better than them quietly dying”.

Fuck.

@histodons
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