Ruth_Mottram , to Random
@Ruth_Mottram@fediscience.org avatar

This is an absolutely brilliant and inspiring piece on , who we are, where we work and what we do in @nature - really demonstrates the diversity of - and importantly the people who do it.

I hope it's not behind a paywall.

https://www.nature.com/immersive/where-i-work-exhibition/index.html

jgpausas , to evolution group
@jgpausas@fediscience.org avatar

"the method can be enriched by using large but not replaced by it. If aims to be a predictive science, we should focus more on a understanding than on describing correlations with vast amounts of "

The need for mechanistic explanations ...
https://nph.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nph.19751 @newphyt


@ecology @plants @botany @wildfirescience @plantscience @nature @biodiversity @conservation @climate
@evolution
@complexsystems @ecologies

bibliolater , to science group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

Not a one hopes to :

Forced to eat bat feces, chimps could spread deadly viruses to humans

"Tobacco farming is driving apes to seek unusual food source, brimming with pathogens"

https://www.doi.org/10.1126/science.zzx18k8

@science

bibliolater , to science group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

Not a one hopes to :

Forced to eat bat feces, chimps could spread deadly viruses to humans

"Tobacco farming is driving apes to seek unusual food source, brimming with pathogens"

https://www.doi.org/10.1126/science.zzx18k8

@science

bibliolater , to AI stuff
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

"All tested LLMs performed poorly on medical code querying, often generating codes conveying imprecise or fabricated information. LLMs are not appropriate for use on medical coding tasks without additional research."

Soroush, A. et al. (2024) 'Large language models are poor medical coders — benchmarking of medical code querying,' NEJM AI [Preprint]. https://doi.org/10.1056/aidbp2300040. @science

benroyce , to Random
@benroyce@mastodon.social avatar

Those of us of a certain age remember when used to be a thing of crunchy hippies. Much like nonsense as well.

Of course, the antivax crowd are mostly types nowadays, and, guess what? MAGA recently went gaga over raw milk.

https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2024/03/10/the-alt-right-rebrand-of-raw-milk-00145625

1/2

benroyce OP ,
@benroyce@mastodon.social avatar

Now I get to "delight" you with a post twist: raw may transmit to humans:

https://www.barrons.com/news/h5n1-strain-of-bird-flu-found-in-milk-who-2ce2c194

There is a very old very good reason why we pasteurize milk. It seems to be forgotten. Everything is not default safe, we made it safe. But everyone with living memory of the hell before and modern medicine and here, safety and sanitary , is dead. And reigns.

They wish to relearn the obvious, with death and suffering for us all.

2/2

bibliolater , to science group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

Newly sequenced genome reveals coffee’s prehistoric origin story — and its future under climate change

"Their findings, published April 15 in Nature Genetics, suggest that Coffea arabica developed more than 600,000 years ago in the forests of Ethiopia via natural mating between two other coffee species. Arabica’s population waxed and waned throughout Earth’s heating and cooling periods over thousands of years, the study found, before eventually being cultivated in Ethiopia and Yemen, and then spread over the globe."

https://www.buffalo.edu/ubnow/stories/2024/04/albert-arabica-genome.html

@science

attribution: MarkSweep, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons. Page URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Roasted_coffee_beans.jpg

bibliolater , to science group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

Newly sequenced genome reveals coffee’s prehistoric origin story — and its future under climate change

"Their findings, published April 15 in Nature Genetics, suggest that Coffea arabica developed more than 600,000 years ago in the forests of Ethiopia via natural mating between two other coffee species. Arabica’s population waxed and waned throughout Earth’s heating and cooling periods over thousands of years, the study found, before eventually being cultivated in Ethiopia and Yemen, and then spread over the globe."

https://www.buffalo.edu/ubnow/stories/2024/04/albert-arabica-genome.html

@science

atrribution: MarkSweep, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons. Page URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Roasted_coffee_beans.jpg

bibliolater , to Archaeodons group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

🇹🇷 Archaeologists find surprisingly well-preserved 8,600-year-old bread in Turkey

"The researchers concluded the bread was fermented after performing scanning electron microscope imaging. The analysis revealed air bubbles in the sample and traces of starch grains. They also found telltale chemicals known to be found in cereals and those that indicate fermentation."

https://www.zmescience.com/science/archaeology/world-oldest-bread/

@science @archaeodons

bibliolater , to science group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar
ChrisMayLA6 , to Random
@ChrisMayLA6@zirk.us avatar

Time to smile with Tom Gauld (again)

Enjoy

davemark , to Random
@davemark@mastodon.social avatar

New vaccine strategy eliminates need for boosters:

"RNA-based vaccine strategy that is effective against any strain of a virus and can be used safely even by babies or the immunocompromised"

  • "one and done" approach
  • targets a part of the viral genome that is common to all strains of a virus
  • tested in mice

Details here...

https://news.ucr.edu/articles/2024/04/15/vaccine-breakthrough-means-no-more-chasing-strains

gutenberg_org , to Random
@gutenberg_org@mastodon.social avatar

British scientist Rosalind Franklin died in 1956.

Her most famous contribution to science came from her X-ray diffraction images of DNA, particularly Photo 51, which provided crucial evidence for the double helix structure of DNA. Her photo was shared without her knowledge with J. Watson & F. Crick, who used it as a basis for their model of DNA's structure. Their work overshadowed her contribution, & she was not fully recognized for her role until after her death.

bibliolater , to science group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

Why European Colonization Drove the Blue Antelope to Extinction

"The results of the study, which have now been published in "Current Biology", show that the species was probably adapted to a small population size and survived like this for thousands of years. However, this also made them susceptible to sudden impacts like hunting, which increased after European colonization of southern Africa."

https://www.uni-potsdam.de/en/pressreleases/detail/2024-04-12-why-european-colonization-drove-the-blue-antelope-to-extinction

@science @biology

bibliolater , to AI stuff
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

ChatGPT hallucinates fake but plausible scientific citations at a staggering rate, study finds

"MacDonald found that a total of 32.3% of the 300 citations generated by ChatGPT were hallucinated. Despite being fabricated, these hallucinated citations were constructed with elements that appeared legitimate — such as real authors who are recognized in their respective fields, properly formatted DOIs, and references to legitimate peer-reviewed journals."

https://www.psypost.org/chatgpt-hallucinates-fake-but-plausible-scientific-citations-at-a-staggering-rate-study-finds/

@science @ai

attribution: Madhav-Malhotra-003, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons. Page URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Artificial_Intelligence_Word_Cloud.png

ml , to AcademicChatter group
@ml@ecoevo.social avatar

With Google search results having been awful for some time now, I have to assume that Google Scholar results are also less satisfactory.

While I'm old enough to have been in undergrad before the WWW, I wasn't in grad school before the 21st c. For those of you old enough, how were you doing literature review of journal articles back in ye olde days? @academicchatter

bibliolater , to science group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

The genesis of our cellular skeleton, image by image

"This unique approach, which combines the very high resolution of expansion microscopy and kinematic reconstruction, has enabled us to model the first 4D assembly of the human centriole."

https://www.unige.ch/medias/en/2024/la-genese-de-notre-squelette-cellulaire-image-par-image

@science @biology

bibliolater , to neuroscience group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

The new science of death: ‘There’s something happening in the brain that makes no sense’

"Perhaps the story to be written about near-death experiences is not that they prove consciousness is radically different from what we thought it was. Instead, it is that the process of dying is far stranger than scientists ever suspected."

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2024/apr/02/new-science-of-death-brain-activity-consciousness-near-death-experience

@science @neuroscience @biology

bibliolater , to physics group
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

Unassuming physicist Professor Peter Higgs ahead of his time

"His concept sparked a 48-year hunt which culminated in July 2012 when a team from the European nuclear research facility at Cern in Geneva announced the detection of a particle that fitted the description of the elusive Higgs."

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/higgs-boson-french-swiss-nobel-prize-in-physics-cern-b2525887.html

@science @physics

erinnacland , to AcademicChatter group
@erinnacland@fediscience.org avatar

"Fewer U.S. scientists are pursuing postdoc positions, new data show" 📉

"The trend underscores concerns that the academic community is facing a postdoc shortage and that early-career scientists are increasingly favoring higher paid positions outside academia."

“It’s not a situation that’s good for the country.”

@academicchatter via @klangin https://www.science.org/content/article/fewer-u-s-scientists-are-pursuing-postdoc-positions-new-data-show

lauren , to Random
@lauren@social.lol avatar

I didn't have a pair of glasses but I had something WAY cooler... a camera obscura!

obtener , to Random
@obtener@mastodon.world avatar
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  • coreyspowell , to Random
    @coreyspowell@mastodon.social avatar

    Johannes de Sacrobosco ("John of Hollywood") published detailed geometric descriptions of a solar eclipse in the year 1230. People in the "dark ages" were not so dumb!

    I dig through 5000 years of eclipse investigations in my latest Invisible Universe column:

    https://invisibleuniverse.substack.com/p/how-we-learned-to-love-the-invisible

    coreyspowell OP ,
    @coreyspowell@mastodon.social avatar

    In 1715, Edmund Halley (of comet fame) was able to predict the timing of the next solar eclipse with an accuracy of 4 minutes! He also produced the first illustrated eclipse forecast.

    That's what is possible once you understand the nature of orbits and have a working theory of gravity...

    https://invisibleuniverse.substack.com/p/how-we-learned-to-love-the-invisible

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    pomarede , to Random
    @pomarede@mastodon.social avatar
    pomarede OP ,
    @pomarede@mastodon.social avatar
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