TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
@TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

HAMS, or HAMCASES Breeches.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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@histodons

seanbala , to bookstodon group
@seanbala@mas.to avatar

Was out today and had unexpected free time but no book!

I opened my @omnivore app on my tablet and read the short story "The Mausoleum's Children" by @aliettedb in @UncannyMagazine. It was so good!! I'm so glad I discovered both the story and the magazine here. Moral of the story - do your best to always have something good to read!

https://www.uncannymagazine.com/article/the-mausoleums-children/

@bookstodon

TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
@TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

INEXPRESSIBLES. Breeches.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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@histodons

TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
@TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

HAVY CAVY. Wavering, doubtful, shilly shally.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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@histodons

TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
@TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

COD. A cod of money: a good sum of money.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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@histodons

TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
@TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

CONGER. To conger; the agreement of a set or knot of booksellers of London, that whosoever of them shall buy a good copy, the rest shall take off such a particular number, in quires, at a stated price; also booksellers joining to buy either a considerable or dangerous copy.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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@histodons

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  • CultureDesk , to bookstodon group
    @CultureDesk@flipboard.social avatar

    When Kathleen Dorothy Blackburn was a child growing up in an evangelical family in Lubbock, Texas, her father, a former air force pilot, was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 38. Her family sought help from preachers, holy men and faith healers but unbeknownst to them, her father had been exposed to high levels of PFAS — as of this month, limited in drinking water by the FDA — on the military sites where he had worked. @TexasObserver has published this extract from Blackburn's memoir, "Loose of Earth," in which she talks about these forever chemicals, how they may have been linked to her father's illness, and a story her grandmother once shared.

    https://flip.it/pFixG3

    @bookstodon

    janbartosik , to bookstodon group
    @janbartosik@witter.cz avatar

    THE HOUSE OF NIRE by Kita Morio

    https://app.thestorygraph.com/books/6d973e07-ee67-4905-9fa2-aa11ba98ec14

    This one took me extraordinarily long. Felt like DNF at times, but I always went on in the end. Well worth it. The first half of the 20th century in from a less frequent perspective.


    @bookstodon @knihy @books @noelleification.wordpress.com

    seanbala , to bookstodon group
    @seanbala@mas.to avatar

    Found this way deep in my YouTube "Watch Later" collection. It's a really nice guide to getting started with Charles Dickens including a recommended order for select books from Robert Douglas-Fairhurst.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aryB10D04jw

    Might add these to my 2024 Reading List!

    @bookstodon

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    MOPED. Stupid, melancholy for want of society.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    BO-PEEP. One who sometimes hides himself, and sometimes appears publicly abroad, is said to-play at bo-peep. Also one who lies perdue, or on the watch.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History April 21, 1910: Mark Twain died. William Faulkner called him "the father of American literature." He grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which provided the setting for “Tom Sawyer” and “Huckleberry Finn.” He apprenticed with a printer and worked as a typesetter, contributing articles to the newspaper of his older brother Orion Clemens. He later worked as a riverboat pilot before heading west to join Orion in Nevada. Twain was famous for his wit and brilliant writing. However, he also had extremely progressive politics for his era. Later in his life, he became an ardent anti-imperialist. “I have read carefully the treaty of Paris and I have seen that we do not intend to free, but to subjugate the people of the Philippines. We have gone there to conquer, not to redeem… And so I am an anti-imperialist. I am opposed to having the eagle put its talons on any other land.” During the Boxer Rebellion, he said that "the Boxer is a patriot. He loves his country better than he does the countries of other people. I wish him success." From 1901, until his death in 1910, he was vice-president of the American Anti-Imperialist League, which opposed the annexation of the Philippines by the U.S. He was also critical of European imperialists such as Cecil Rhodes and King Leopold II of Belgium, who attempted to establish colonies in African. He also supported the Russian revolutionaries fighting against the Tsar.

    Many people have criticized him for his racism. Indeed, schools have banned “Huckleberry Finn.” However, Twain was an adamant supporter of abolition and said that the Emancipation Proclamation “not only set the black slaves free, but set the white man free also." He also fought for the rights of immigrants, particularly the Chinese. "I have seen Chinamen abused and maltreated in all the mean, cowardly ways possible... but I never saw a Chinaman righted in a court of justice for wrongs thus done to him." And though his early writings were racist against indigenous peoples, he later wrote that “in colonized lands all over the world, "savages" have always been wronged by "whites" in the most merciless ways, such as "robbery, humiliation, and slow, slow murder, through poverty and the white man's whiskey."

    Twain was also an early feminist, who campaigned for women's suffrage. He also wrote in support of unions and the labor movement, especially the Knights of Labor, one of the most important unions of the era. “Who are the oppressors? The few: the King, the capitalist, and a handful of other overseers and superintendents. Who are the oppressed? The many: the nations of the earth; the valuable personages; the workers; they that make the bread that the soft-handed and idle eat.”

    @bookstadon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History April 21, 1816: Charlotte Brontë, English novelist and poet, was born. After her mother died of cancer, in 1821, her father sent the five Brontë sisters to Clergy Daughters' School, where the two eldest sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, contracted tuberculosis. The disease killed them both in 1825. Charlotte always said that the terrible conditions in that school stunted her physical development and caused her lifelong health problems. Charlotte wrote her first poem in 1829, at the age of 13. She would go on to write 200 more poems. In 1836, she asked Poet Laureate Robert Southey for encouragement as a writer. He replied, “Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life, and ought not to be.” Because of this advice, she chose to publish under the gender-neutral name of Currer Bell, to avoid prejudice. She published a book of poetry in 1846, and her most famous novel, “Jane Eyre,” in 1847. In Jane Eyre, she uses the Clergy Daughters' School as the model for the school attended by her eponymous protagonist, Jane Eyre. Bronte died in 1855, most likely from hyperemesis gravidarum, a complication of pregnancy.

    As young adults, my brothers and I thoroughly looted our parent’s library. I still have many of those books, with their dog-eared pages and faint whiff of mildew. I think of them as comfort food for the mind. I picked up some great Melville that way, and Jack London, too. But my favorite score was a matching set of Jayne Eyre and Wuthering Heights that I recently found in their library, after my father died. My mom told me that they had belonged to her mother, who passed them down to her. And now she was passing them down to me. Great literature, of course, but they also contain beautiful artwork. And provenance, with my grandmother’s name printed on the inside cover.

    @bookstadon

    Book covers of Wuthering Heights, with an aguished man standing against a tree, and Jane Eyre, with a parade of very goth-looking little girls.

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    BIBLE. A boatswain's great axe. Sea term.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

    scotlit , to bookstodon group
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    Alistair MacLean (1922–1987) – author of The Guns of Navarone, Ice Station Zebra, Where Eagles Dare, & many others – was born , 21 April, 1922. A native speaker, he grew up near Inverness. @NeilDrysdale tells the story of MacLean’s remarkable life

    @bookstodon

    1/4

    https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/past-times/2390095/from-arctic-convoys-to-far-east-vj-day-missions-alistair-macleans-life-was-a-real-life-thriller/

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    CURSITORS. Broken petty-fogging attornies, or Newgate solicitors. CANT.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    @histodons

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    CHIVING LAY. Cutting the braces of coaches behind, on which the coachman quitting the box, an accomplice robs the boot; also, formerly, cutting the back of the coach to steal the fine large wigs then worn.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    CHEEKS. Ask cheeks near cunnyborough; the repartee of a St. Gilese's fair one, who bids you ask her backside, anglice her arse.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

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    @histodons

    bibliolater , to bookstodon group
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

    Questions over Shakespeare’s authorship began in his lifetime, scholar claims

    "New research suggests some 16th-century writers were confident Shakespeare was the pseudonym of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford"

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2024/apr/19/questions-over-shakespeares-authorship-began-in-his-lifetime-scholar-claims

    @bookstodon @literature

    : Martin Droeshout, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons. Page URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:William_Shakespeare_MET_DP858182.jpg

    avldigital , to germanistik group German
    @avldigital@openbiblio.social avatar

    Das Institut für Allgemeine und Vergleichende bietet an der Goethe Universität Frankfurt den Masterstudiengang , für den am 23. April 2024 eine Informationsveranstaltung per zoom stattfinden wird, an.

    (2/2)🗓️Bewerbungsfrist: 31. Mai 2024

    📌Weitere Informationen:
    https://avldigital.de/de/vernetzen/details/event/masterstudiengang-comparative-literature-an-der-goethe-universitat-frankfurt-informationsveranstalt/ @germanistik @litstudies @italianstudies

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    BASTARDLY GULLION. A bastard's bastard.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    NUG. An endearing word: as, My dear nug; my dear love.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    LANTHORN-JAWED. Thin-visaged: from their cheeks being almost transparent. Or else, lenten jawed; i.e. having the jaws of one emaciated by a too rigid observation of Lent. Dark lanthorn; a servant or agent at court, who receives a bribe for his principal or master.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

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  • scotlit , to bookstodon group
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    POOR THINGS
    by Alasdair Gray

    “As Yorgos Lanthimos’ film adaptation of Alasdair Gray’s novel POOR THINGS has received not only rave reviews but numerous accolades, including four Oscars, it’s the perfect time to look at the source material. This is not a comparison between the two but rather a chance to give those who don’t know the novel an idea of what to expect, and of what makes it exceptional.”

    @bookstodon

    https://snackmag.co.uk/book-review-poor-things-by-alasdair-gray

    TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
    @TheVulgarTongue@zirk.us avatar

    SCRIP. A scrap or slip of paper. The cully freely blotted the scrip, and tipt me forty hogs; the man freely signed the bond, and gave me forty shillings.--Scrip is also a Change Alley phrase for the last loan or subscription.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
    @histodons

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