booktweeting , to bookstodon group
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HORRORS BOTH HUMAN AND SUPERNATURAL roll out with a relentless, breathtaking pace in this final installment of the Indian Lake Trilogy. As ever, Stephen Graham Jones’s deft characterization and vivid sense of place drive the chill deep. B PLUS

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-angel-of-indian-lake-stephen-graham-jones/1143653097?ean=9781668060889

@bookstodon

MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
@MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

If you're in Vegas on Memorial Day Weekend, come see all the great live bands...AND most of all, come see me read from my historical novel, Anywhere But Schuylkill. I'll be on the ticket with several other great writers, including Billy Bragg, and my good friend James Tracy.

https://www.facebook.com/events/339246572411041

@bookstadon

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  • MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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    If you're in the SF Bay Area on May 5, please come to the Book Release Party for Roberta Tracy's "Zig Zag Woman."

    I'll be there, too, reading an excerpt from my working class historical novel, "Anywhere But Schuylkill."

    Alibi Bookshop - Vallejo, CA, 4:30pm

    https://www.facebook.com/events/442829048498572

    @bookstadon

    fictionable , to bookstodon group
    @fictionable@lor.sh avatar

    Subscribe to @fictionable for £20 and get access to our of more than 30 exclusive from including Sarah Hall, Amy Sackville, Michael Donkor, Adania Shibli…

    And from Sabba Khan, Lizzy Stewart, Isabel Greenberg…

    Plus a year's worth of brand new from writers all around the world.

    Image: MC

    @bookstodon

    bibliolater , to bookstodon group
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

    Decoding Ulysses: How Joyce Published The Novel of the Century + How To Read It

    "A brief history of the mess James Joyce had to put up with to publish Ulysses and how to read the text without losing your mind ft. Prof. Rónán McDonald, The Gerry Higgins Chair of Irish Studies."

    https://youtu.be/eHxDpwx9XBE

    @bookstodon

    CultureDesk , to Technology
    @CultureDesk@flipboard.social avatar

    Does sci-fi shape the future? Tech billionaires from Bill Gates to Elon Musk have often talked about the impact of novels they read as teens, from Neal Stephenson's "Snow Crash" to Iain M. Banks' "Culture" series. Big Think's Namir Khaliq spoke to authors including Andy Weir, Lois McMaster Bujold and @pluralistic about how much impact they think science fiction has had, or can have.

    https://flip.it/DmHzd2

    @bookstodon

    fictionable , to bookstodon group
    @fictionable@lor.sh avatar

    Readings, chat, jokes – check out the in-depth interviews with like Sarah Hall, @mjohnharrison Joyce Carol Oates, @SmythBooks Diana Evans and more on the @fictionable

    Download for free at https://fictionable.world or via and elsewhere…

    Image: Pierre Gui

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    booktweeting , to bookstodon group
    @booktweeting@zirk.us avatar

    AN ASPIRING THIEF OF MAGICAL jewels falls into a series of predicaments that leave her responsible for stopping a murder before it happens. Charming fantasy mystery with plenty of wit and action. B PLUS

    https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/an-uncertain-murder-devan-barlow/1144948474

    @bookstodon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History April, 21, 1913: Andre Soudy and Raymond Callemin, members of the anarchist Bonnot Gang, were executed. Callemin had started the individualist paper "L'anarchie" with author and revolutionary Victor Serge. The Bonnot Gang was a band of French anarchists who tried to fund their movement through robberies in 1911-1912. The Bonnot Gang was unique, not only for their politics, but for their innovative use of technology, too. They were among the first to use cars and automatic rifles to help them steal, technology that even the French police were not using. While many of the gang members were sentenced to death, Serge got five years and eventually went on to participate in (and survive) the Barcelona and Soviet uprisings. Later, while living in exile, Serge wrote The Birth of Our Power, Men in Prison, Conquered City, and Memoirs of a Revolutionary.

    @bookstadon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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    Today in Labor History April 21, 1910: Mark Twain died. William Faulkner called him "the father of American literature." He grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which provided the setting for “Tom Sawyer” and “Huckleberry Finn.” He apprenticed with a printer and worked as a typesetter, contributing articles to the newspaper of his older brother Orion Clemens. He later worked as a riverboat pilot before heading west to join Orion in Nevada. Twain was famous for his wit and brilliant writing. However, he also had extremely progressive politics for his era. Later in his life, he became an ardent anti-imperialist. “I have read carefully the treaty of Paris and I have seen that we do not intend to free, but to subjugate the people of the Philippines. We have gone there to conquer, not to redeem… And so I am an anti-imperialist. I am opposed to having the eagle put its talons on any other land.” During the Boxer Rebellion, he said that "the Boxer is a patriot. He loves his country better than he does the countries of other people. I wish him success." From 1901, until his death in 1910, he was vice-president of the American Anti-Imperialist League, which opposed the annexation of the Philippines by the U.S. He was also critical of European imperialists such as Cecil Rhodes and King Leopold II of Belgium, who attempted to establish colonies in African. He also supported the Russian revolutionaries fighting against the Tsar.

    Many people have criticized him for his racism. Indeed, schools have banned “Huckleberry Finn.” However, Twain was an adamant supporter of abolition and said that the Emancipation Proclamation “not only set the black slaves free, but set the white man free also." He also fought for the rights of immigrants, particularly the Chinese. "I have seen Chinamen abused and maltreated in all the mean, cowardly ways possible... but I never saw a Chinaman righted in a court of justice for wrongs thus done to him." And though his early writings were racist against indigenous peoples, he later wrote that “in colonized lands all over the world, "savages" have always been wronged by "whites" in the most merciless ways, such as "robbery, humiliation, and slow, slow murder, through poverty and the white man's whiskey."

    Twain was also an early feminist, who campaigned for women's suffrage. He also wrote in support of unions and the labor movement, especially the Knights of Labor, one of the most important unions of the era. “Who are the oppressors? The few: the King, the capitalist, and a handful of other overseers and superintendents. Who are the oppressed? The many: the nations of the earth; the valuable personages; the workers; they that make the bread that the soft-handed and idle eat.”

    @bookstadon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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    Today in Labor History April 21, 1816: Charlotte Brontë, English novelist and poet, was born. After her mother died of cancer, in 1821, her father sent the five Brontë sisters to Clergy Daughters' School, where the two eldest sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, contracted tuberculosis. The disease killed them both in 1825. Charlotte always said that the terrible conditions in that school stunted her physical development and caused her lifelong health problems. Charlotte wrote her first poem in 1829, at the age of 13. She would go on to write 200 more poems. In 1836, she asked Poet Laureate Robert Southey for encouragement as a writer. He replied, “Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life, and ought not to be.” Because of this advice, she chose to publish under the gender-neutral name of Currer Bell, to avoid prejudice. She published a book of poetry in 1846, and her most famous novel, “Jane Eyre,” in 1847. In Jane Eyre, she uses the Clergy Daughters' School as the model for the school attended by her eponymous protagonist, Jane Eyre. Bronte died in 1855, most likely from hyperemesis gravidarum, a complication of pregnancy.

    As young adults, my brothers and I thoroughly looted our parent’s library. I still have many of those books, with their dog-eared pages and faint whiff of mildew. I think of them as comfort food for the mind. I picked up some great Melville that way, and Jack London, too. But my favorite score was a matching set of Jayne Eyre and Wuthering Heights that I recently found in their library, after my father died. My mom told me that they had belonged to her mother, who passed them down to her. And now she was passing them down to me. Great literature, of course, but they also contain beautiful artwork. And provenance, with my grandmother’s name printed on the inside cover.

    @bookstadon

    Book covers of Wuthering Heights, with an aguished man standing against a tree, and Jane Eyre, with a parade of very goth-looking little girls.

    18+ AimeeMaroux , to LesFic group
    @AimeeMaroux@mastodon.social avatar

    The völva Heiði, a Norse seeress, has trouble looking into the future. Praying to Freyja for help, she never expected such a hands-on approach by the Mistress of Magic...

    https://eroticmythology.com/fiction-freyja-volva/


    @smutstodon @mythology @lesfic

    booktweeting , to bookstodon group
    @booktweeting@zirk.us avatar

    THE CONQUISTADORES’ ARRIVAL, REIMAGINED in a playfully serious tale that darts as kaleidoscopically as a hummingbird between culture and culture and between the empires of past and present. Powerfully visual, sardonically witty. SOLID A

    https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/you-dreamed-of-empires-lvaro-enrigue/1143331343?ean=9780593544792

    @bookstodon

    arratoon , to bookstadon group
    @arratoon@beige.party avatar

    Book 27, 2024: Your Love is Not Good by Johanna Hedva. Best book I’ve read this year, this incendiary novel follows an artist who becomes obsessed with a model, builds a career, fucks up their career, reflects on trauma, whiteness, Berlin, kink, dogs… So good.

    @bookstadon

    dbsalk , to bookstodon group
    @dbsalk@mastodon.social avatar

    I really need to start keeping notes on how/why I put a book to my TBR pile. The East Indian by Brinda Charry was added about a year ago, and I don't remember how I found out about it. A truly unique tale about an Indian boy winding up first in England and then Virginia during the 17th century efforts at colonization, for me this book is historical fiction at its absolute best. It might be one of the best books I pick up in 2024. @bookstodon

    appassionato , to bookstodon group
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    Bogotá 39 New Voices from Latin America, 2018

    ‘This new generation of Latin American writers has exchanged history for memory, dictators for narcos and political engagement for gender and class consciousness.’ (El País)

    With authors from fifteen different countries, this diverse collection of stories transports readers to a host of new worlds, and represents the very best writing coming out of Latin America today.

    @bookstodon



    18+ AimeeMaroux , to LesFic group
    @AimeeMaroux@mastodon.social avatar

    New story up for patrons of my writing! This time, we are meeting , goddess of love, war, and magic from 💖

    https://eroticmythology.com/fiction-freyja-volva/


    @smutstodon @mythology @medievodons @lesfic

    bibliolater , to bookstodon group
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    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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    Today in Labor History April 17, 2014: Journalist and author Gabriel Garcia Marquez died on this day. Affectionately known as Gabo, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982. Two of his most famous books were, One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) and Love in the Time of Cholera (1985). Garcia Marquez was a socialist and an anti-imperialist, and critical of U.S. policy in Latin America.

    @bookstadon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History April 16, 1884: Anatole France was born. He was a poet and novelist and won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1921. Many of his works satirized religious and political ideas. The son of a bookseller, France spent much of his childhood in his family’s bookstore, reading voraciously, and meeting many of the writers who frequented the store. He was active in the movement to free Alfred Dreyfus, a Jewish army officer falsely accused of espionage. And he signed Emile Zola’s letter in support of Dreyfus, “J’accuse.” France wrote about wrote about the affair in his 1901 novel “Monsieur Bergeret.” France's novel, “Penguin Island depicts penguins transformed into humans after the birds have been mistakenly baptized by the almost-blind Abbot Mael. “The Gods Are Athirst” (1912), about a true-believing follower of Maximilien Robespierre and the Reign of Terror of 1793–94, is a wake-up call against political and ideological fanaticism. “The Revolt of the Angels” (1914) it tells the story of Arcade, a bored guardian angel who starts reading his mentee’s books on theology and becomes an atheist, moves to Paris, falls in love, and loses his virginity causing his wings to fall off. He then joins the revolutionary movement of fallen angels.

    @bookstadon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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    Today in Labor History April 16, 1994: Ralph Ellison died on this day. Ellison was a member of the Harlem Renaissance, best known for his book, The Invisible Man. He was friends with Langston Hughes and Richard Wright. He became active in the Communist Party, as did many of his peers. But he became disillusioned with them during World War II when he felt they became reformist. He wrote The Invisible Man during this era (published in 1952), in part, as a response their betrayal. But the book also looks at the relationship between black identity and Marxism, the reformism of Booker T. Washington, and issues of individuality and personal identity.

    @bookstadon

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  • booktweeting , to bookstodon group
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    SUMMONING THE DEAD was only the first mistake Alex made—things got a lot worse after that. Sharp, evocative horror novel has a powerful sense of place and of the terrors of suffocating slowly in dead-end towns. B PLUS

    https://www.cemeterydance.com/thesethingslingerFranklin

    @bookstodon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History April 14, 1935: The Black Sunday dust storm swept across the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. This was one of the worst storms of the Dust Bowl. 4 years later, on this same date, John Steinbeck published his classic working-class novel, The Grapes of Wrath, about Dust Bowl refugees in California.

    @bookstadon

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  • tinadonahuebooks , to bookstodon group
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    A Book Club's Guide to Murder & Mayhem - A Suzie Tuft Mystery Series Book One - Cozy Mystery

    https://tinadonahuebooks.blogspot.com/2024/04/a-book-clubs-guide-to-murder-mayhem.html

    @bookstodon

    fictionable , to bookstodon group
    @fictionable@lor.sh avatar

    Subscribe to @fictionable for £20 and get access to our of more than 30 exclusive from including Joyce Carol Oates, Ali Smith, Diana Evans @mjohnharrison Etgar Keret…

    And from Sabba Khan, Lizzy Stewart, Isabel Greenberg…

    Plus a year's worth of brand new from writers all around the world.

    Image: Emil Widlund

    @bookstodon

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