edintone , to geneadons
@edintone@mastodon.green avatar
estelle , to random
@estelle@techhub.social avatar

Here is an overview of how British rich nobility weaponised "race" to deport people in servitude.

Let's start with a landmark book:

estelle OP ,
@estelle@techhub.social avatar

“It is difficult to picture the rich, hard-nosed advisors of James I being overly concerned about the rights of vagabonds and felons. But this was a period that was especially suspicious of arbitrary acts by the Crown against individuals. There was no law enabling the crown to exile anyone, including the baser convict, into forced labour. According to legal scholars, the Magna Carta itself protected even them. The Privy Councillors therefore dressed up what was to befall the convicts and presented the decree authorising their transportation as an act of royal mercy. The convicts were to be reprieved from death in exchange for accepting transportation. (71)”
― Don Jordan and Michael Walsh, "White Cargo: The Forgotten History of Britain's White Slaves in America" (2007)

@history @histodons 🧶

estelle OP ,
@estelle@techhub.social avatar

“It is difficult to picture the rich, hard-nosed advisors of James I being overly concerned about the rights of vagabonds and felons. But this was a period that was especially suspicious of arbitrary acts by the Crown against individuals. There was no law enabling the crown to exile anyone, including the baser convict, into forced labour. According to legal scholars, the Magna Carta itself protected even them. The Privy Councillors therefore dressed up what was to befall the convicts and presented the decree authorising their transportation as an act of royal mercy. The convicts were to be reprieved from death in exchange for accepting transportation.” (p. 71)
― Don Jordan and Michael Walsh, "White Cargo: The Forgotten History of Britain's White Slaves in America" (2007)

@history @histodons
(to be continued) 🧶

bibliolater , to histodon
@bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 "These sources promise the potential to explore fascinatingly-detailed stories of the nation’s fluctuating prosperity, of industrial and agricultural development and decline, and of changing fashions and tastes." https://blog.history.ac.uk/2024/01/unlocking-the-records-of-londons-medieval-foreign-trade/ @histodon @histodons @medievodons

stefano , to random
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    court , to histodons
    @court@dreamers-guild.net avatar

    in - in 1327, a young king Edward III of celebrates his coronation in Westminster Abbey. His father, Edward II, had celebrated his own coronation there in 1308. Edward II hadn't yet died when his son was coronated, and he hadn't willingly abdicated - the elder king had been overthrown by his wife, Isabella, and a small army of French mercenaries.
    As king, the boy overthrew his mother's regency and was exceedingly popular in his lifetime.
    @histodons

    bibliolater , to earlymodern
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

    🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 "Hume saw Protestant theology—especially the more enthusiastic strains of English Puritanism—as having fortuitously shifted the landscape of political and economic sensibilities in England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries by affecting believers’ political, social, and economic psychologies."

    Matson EW. HUME ON THE PROTESTANT ETHIC AND THE RISE OF ENGLISH COMMERCIAL SPIRIT. Journal of the History of Economic Thought. Published online 2024:1-23. doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1053837223000585 @philosophy @historyofeconomics @earlymodern

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History January 31, 1606: Guy Fawkes jumped to his death moments before his execution for treason. Guy Fawkes belonged to a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Fawkes, who had converted to Catholicism, also fought in the 80-Years War for Catholic Spain against the Dutch. He later traveled to Spain seeking support for a Catholic rebellion in England. The English tortured him into confessing the names of his co-conspirators. Brits have celebrated Guy Fawkes Day ever since, usually accompanied by fireworks and burning effigies, traditionally the pope, but recently they’ve burned effigies of Liz Truss, Rishi Sunak and Margaret Thatcher, instead. James Sharpe, professor of history at the University of York, called Fawkes "the last man to enter Parliament with honest intentions." Numerous historical novels and children’s books have been written about Fawkes, including William Harrison Ainsworth's 1841 historical romance “Guy Fawkes; or, The Gunpowder Treason.”

    @bookstadon

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  • court , to histodons
    @court@dreamers-guild.net avatar

    in - in 1649, Charles I of and was executed just outside the Banqueting House, London. It was a chilly day and he wore an extra shirt so he wouldn't shiver (worried the gathered people would think he was afraid instead of cold). The axe man took his head in one blow.
    Unpopular as an adult, Charles was never meant to be king - he only was 11 when his older brother Henry died, making Charles the heir rather than the spare.
    @histodons

    bibliolater , to histodon
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

    🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 🇪🇸

    "The diplomatic negotiations undertaken by the English select councillors and their Spanish and Flemish counterparts place England firmly within the conciliar framework of the Spanish Monarchy and provide an invaluable window from which to explore the role of England as a fully integrated member of a composite monarchy extending from Naples and Oran to Lima and Mexico City."

    Gonzalo Velasco Berenguer, The Select Council of Philip I: A Spanish Institution in Tudor England, 1555–1558, The English Historical Review, 2024;, cead216, https://doi.org/10.1093/ehr/cead216 @histodon @histodons

    knavalesi , to antiquidons
    @knavalesi@mastodon.social avatar

    An iron age metal-forging shop has been discovered in Oxfordshire, complete with bellows protectors and the tiny bits of metal that flew off as the red hot iron was hammered into shape.

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2024/jan/28/high-end-iron-age-smithy-oxfordshire-blacksmith

    @historikerinnen
    @histodons
    @archaeodons
    @antiquidons

    historyshapes , to til
    @historyshapes@mastodon.social avatar
    pivic , to bookstodon
    @pivic@kolektiva.social avatar
    pivic OP ,
    @pivic@kolektiva.social avatar

    I guessed it'd just be a matter of time until 'The Thick of It' was mentioned in this book.

    @bookstodon

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  • pivic OP ,
    @pivic@kolektiva.social avatar

    For some politicians, racists are despicable until you start losing voters to them:

    "Victory in the fight for trust with the economy was critical.

    Another was countering the UK Independence Party (Ukip). It is easy to forget what a potent political force Nigel Farage's band of rightwing Eurosceptic insurgents then was - and what a threat it posed to the Conservatives. Its blend of status quo-bashing, saying the 'unsayable' and tapping into concerns on immigration and crime was effective against a Tory Party that had been pushed towards the centre ground. In 2014, Ukip came top in the European Parliament elections, picking up one in every four votes. They were flipping Tory MPs too, with Douglas Carswell and Mark Reckless defecting to Ukip and winning the subsequent by-elections. Ukip would go on to get almost four million votes at the 2015 election, more than 12 per cent of the total, coming second in 120 seats, but getting across the line in just one: Carswell's Clacton. Farage called the result, a reflection of the old first-past-the-post rules that the Lib Dems had tried to ditch, 'very, very painful'. 'Never in the history of British politics has anybody got more votes with fewer seats,' Farage said in an interview.

    Back in 2006, Cameron had dubbed Ukip supporters a bunch of fruitcakes and loonies and closet racists'. Come 2015, he was offering an olive branch to tempt 'my little purple friends' back to the blue side. The major move here came in January 2013 with the promise of an in/out referendum on European Union membership - the starting gun on the race that would end with Brexit. The threat was less that of Ukip winning vast numbers of seats than of denying Tory victories by forcing down their vote totals, allowing another party to sneak in at the top. Isaac Levido, another Australian political strategist who is often seen as Crosby's protégé and who would lead Johnson's winning 2019 election campaign, was inside the Tory tent for 2015 and acknowledged the danger. 'Ukip were an existential threat to us getting into a majority government, Levido said. "They only needed to perform marginally better in a handful of seats and we wouldn't have won a majority?"

    @bookstodon

    georgepenney , to bookstodon
    @georgepenney@sunny.garden avatar

    Lovely people in the north of who enjoy crime, fantasy and humour with a hint of ...or just having a good laugh, Caimh (C.K. McDonnell) puts on an amazing event on his book tours. He's a former standup comedian and he knows how to entertain.

    It also helps that the books are freakin' amazing!

    @bookstodon

    bibliolater , to bookstodon
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar
    bibliolater , to histodons
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

    "This article seeks to understand mercantilism not as an elite philosophy, but as a process of interaction between private interests that stretched beyond London across England and the wider world, in which contribution to the public interest was asserted primarily by the capacity of a trade to support domestic employment in an increasingly global economy."

    Hugo Bromley, England’s Mercantilism: Trading Companies, Employment and the Politics of Trade in Global History, 1688–1704, The English Historical Review, 2023;, cead177, https://doi.org/10.1093/ehr/cead177 @histodon @histodons

    bibliolater , to science
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

    "Medieval hospitals were founded to provide charity, but poverty and infirmity were broad and socially determined categories and little is known about the residents of these institutions and the pathways that led them there. Combining skeletal, isotopic and genetic data, the authors weave a collective biography of individuals buried at the Hospital of St John the Evangelist, Cambridge."

    Inskip S, Cessford C, Dittmar J, et al. Pathways to the medieval hospital: collective osteobiographies of poverty and charity. Antiquity. 2023;97(396):1581-1597. doi: https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2023.167 @archaeodons @science

    appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    The White Ship
    Conquest, Anarchy and the Wrecking of Henry I's Dream

    The sinking of the White Ship on the 25th November 1120 is one of the greatest disasters that England has ever suffered. Its repercussions would change English and European history for ever.

    @bookstodon



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  • appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    The Tudors in Love
    Passion and Politics in the Age of England's Most Famous Dynasty

    In this groundbreaking history, Sarah Gristwood reveals the way courtly love made and marred the
    Tudor dynasty.

    @bookstodon




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  • rabia_elizabeth , to bookstodon
    @rabia_elizabeth@mefi.social avatar

    Tinker Tailor and le Carré nerds, take note: the Le Carré (pod)Cast will be deep diving on the universe of Tinker Tailor for the next several episodes , in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the book’s publication, Insha Allah.

    If you loved the look and atmosphere of the 2010 film adaptation, the first two episodes of the series on shabby 70’s London are for you.

    @bookstodon

    The le Carré Cast - A podcast on John le Carré novels | Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and Shabby 70’s London Part 1
    https://www.podbean.com/ei/dir-yvzde-1bb12656?wlapp=1

    appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    The Pirate Who Stole Scotland: William Dampier and the Creation of the United Kingdom

    He was a pirate, a brute and a devious sociopath. But he was also a scientist and a talented writer who gave his readers accurate descriptions of previously unknown places, peoples, plants and animals. He was a daring explorer and an expert navigator who mapped coastlines and logged wind patterns and ocean currents.
    @bookstodon






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  • bibliolater , to histodon
    @bibliolater@qoto.org avatar

    🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 "Hand-drawn map of England and Wales by Christopher Saxton in 1579." @histodon @histodons

    Attribution: Christopher Saxton, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Page URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Anglia_Atlas.jpg

    historyshapes , to histodons
    @historyshapes@mastodon.social avatar

    Dine with the upper crust and save some bread while you're at it. Welcome to the Toast Sandwich 🥪

    Introduced in 1861 by the original food influencer, Isabella Beeton 🍞

    https://www.historyshapes.com/featured/toast-sandwich/

    @histodons

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