MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon group
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Today in Labor History April, 21, 1913: Andre Soudy and Raymond Callemin, members of the anarchist Bonnot Gang, were executed. Callemin had started the individualist paper "L'anarchie" with author and revolutionary Victor Serge. The Bonnot Gang was a band of French anarchists who tried to fund their movement through robberies in 1911-1912. The Bonnot Gang was unique, not only for their politics, but for their innovative use of technology, too. They were among the first to use cars and automatic rifles to help them steal, technology that even the French police were not using. While many of the gang members were sentenced to death, Serge got five years and eventually went on to participate in (and survive) the Barcelona and Soviet uprisings. Later, while living in exile, Serge wrote The Birth of Our Power, Men in Prison, Conquered City, and Memoirs of a Revolutionary.

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Today in Labor History April 21, 1910: Mark Twain died. William Faulkner called him "the father of American literature." He grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which provided the setting for “Tom Sawyer” and “Huckleberry Finn.” He apprenticed with a printer and worked as a typesetter, contributing articles to the newspaper of his older brother Orion Clemens. He later worked as a riverboat pilot before heading west to join Orion in Nevada. Twain was famous for his wit and brilliant writing. However, he also had extremely progressive politics for his era. Later in his life, he became an ardent anti-imperialist. “I have read carefully the treaty of Paris and I have seen that we do not intend to free, but to subjugate the people of the Philippines. We have gone there to conquer, not to redeem… And so I am an anti-imperialist. I am opposed to having the eagle put its talons on any other land.” During the Boxer Rebellion, he said that "the Boxer is a patriot. He loves his country better than he does the countries of other people. I wish him success." From 1901, until his death in 1910, he was vice-president of the American Anti-Imperialist League, which opposed the annexation of the Philippines by the U.S. He was also critical of European imperialists such as Cecil Rhodes and King Leopold II of Belgium, who attempted to establish colonies in African. He also supported the Russian revolutionaries fighting against the Tsar.

Many people have criticized him for his racism. Indeed, schools have banned “Huckleberry Finn.” However, Twain was an adamant supporter of abolition and said that the Emancipation Proclamation “not only set the black slaves free, but set the white man free also." He also fought for the rights of immigrants, particularly the Chinese. "I have seen Chinamen abused and maltreated in all the mean, cowardly ways possible... but I never saw a Chinaman righted in a court of justice for wrongs thus done to him." And though his early writings were racist against indigenous peoples, he later wrote that “in colonized lands all over the world, "savages" have always been wronged by "whites" in the most merciless ways, such as "robbery, humiliation, and slow, slow murder, through poverty and the white man's whiskey."

Twain was also an early feminist, who campaigned for women's suffrage. He also wrote in support of unions and the labor movement, especially the Knights of Labor, one of the most important unions of the era. “Who are the oppressors? The few: the King, the capitalist, and a handful of other overseers and superintendents. Who are the oppressed? The many: the nations of the earth; the valuable personages; the workers; they that make the bread that the soft-handed and idle eat.”

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Today in Labor History April 21, 1816: Charlotte Brontë, English novelist and poet, was born. After her mother died of cancer, in 1821, her father sent the five Brontë sisters to Clergy Daughters' School, where the two eldest sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, contracted tuberculosis. The disease killed them both in 1825. Charlotte always said that the terrible conditions in that school stunted her physical development and caused her lifelong health problems. Charlotte wrote her first poem in 1829, at the age of 13. She would go on to write 200 more poems. In 1836, she asked Poet Laureate Robert Southey for encouragement as a writer. He replied, “Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life, and ought not to be.” Because of this advice, she chose to publish under the gender-neutral name of Currer Bell, to avoid prejudice. She published a book of poetry in 1846, and her most famous novel, “Jane Eyre,” in 1847. In Jane Eyre, she uses the Clergy Daughters' School as the model for the school attended by her eponymous protagonist, Jane Eyre. Bronte died in 1855, most likely from hyperemesis gravidarum, a complication of pregnancy.

As young adults, my brothers and I thoroughly looted our parent’s library. I still have many of those books, with their dog-eared pages and faint whiff of mildew. I think of them as comfort food for the mind. I picked up some great Melville that way, and Jack London, too. But my favorite score was a matching set of Jayne Eyre and Wuthering Heights that I recently found in their library, after my father died. My mom told me that they had belonged to her mother, who passed them down to her. And now she was passing them down to me. Great literature, of course, but they also contain beautiful artwork. And provenance, with my grandmother’s name printed on the inside cover.

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Book covers of Wuthering Heights, with an aguished man standing against a tree, and Jane Eyre, with a parade of very goth-looking little girls.

queerscifi , to lgbtqbookstodon group
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New: Lisa Oliver's MM fantasy romance A Marriage of Necessity:

I owe my mother everything.

Jasper, the youngest Prince from Lowenthorp, had one driving need – to get away from the castle. After being abducted, abused, and having lost an eye, Jasper believed his only chance of keeping his Mother safe...

https://www.queerscifi.com/new-release-a-marriage-of-necessity-lisa-oliver/

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JD_Cunningham , to bookstodon group
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"The armchairs were exhausted, worn out by life, and during the night they liked to stretch out their arms, legs, and backs, creaking and groaning." -- from 'Memories' by Teffi; trans. Robert Chandler & others
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Of course now everyone is going to want to read it. Also, there needs to be a book or documentary about the drama behind the book.

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‘He erased the entire project’ … the book Stanley Kubrick didn’t want anyone to read to be published

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2024/apr/21/stanley-kubrick-director-book-block-flaws-films-published

TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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BIBLE. A boatswain's great axe. Sea term.

A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

--
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clacksee , to lgbtqbookstodon group
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has gone to @cknightwrites for the first stage of editing. Which means I now have four weeks to completely rebuild my website/store. From scratch. It's a bit of a gargantuan task. Eek!

Wish me luck!

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A Brief History of Fascist Lies by Federico Finchelstein, 2020

"There is no better book on fascism's complex and vexed relationship with truth."––Jason Stanley, author of *How Fascism Works: The Politics of Us and Them

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  • bibliolater , to bookstodon group
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    I bought some cheap highlighters yesterday for annotating purposes. I hope they do not bleed through the pages of the .

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    bibliolater , to bookstodon group
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    , it is time to get back to the .

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    attribution: Rijksmuseum, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons. Page URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portret_van_Ren%C3%A9_Descartes,_RP-P-OB-55.341.jpg

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    Secrecy World by Jake Bernstein, 2024

    A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist takes us inside the world revealed by the Panama Papers, a landscape of illicit money, political corruption, and fraud on a global scale.

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    CURSITORS. Broken petty-fogging attornies, or Newgate solicitors. CANT.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
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    MonadicBlurbs , to bookstodon group
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    Hey there!

    Looking for something new to read?

    Below the Heavens is a high fantasy indie book series inspired by East Asian mythology and culture.

    Available for free in webnovel form on RoyalRoad, via their webpage or mobile app, found in my bio!

    @bookstodon

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  • beexcessivelydiverting , to bookstodon group
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    beexcessivelydiverting , to bookstodon group
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    and the Brontes Issue #9 Why You Should Be Reading Jane Austen

    https://excessivelydiverting.substack.Bookstodonen-bronte-issue-9-why-you-should-read-austen?publication_id=2233006&post_id=143793548&isFreemail=false&r=1ep55&triedRedirect=true

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    kenthompson , to bookstodon group
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    Librarians in several states can now be jailed for years for making “pornography” available. Let’s be clear about intent here - it is to limit descriptions of the lives of LGBTQ people, where possible down to the level that we even exist.
    @bookstodon

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2024/04/16/library-legislation-restrictions-protections/

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  • TheVulgarTongue Bot , to histodons group
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    CHIVING LAY. Cutting the braces of coaches behind, on which the coachman quitting the box, an accomplice robs the boot; also, formerly, cutting the back of the coach to steal the fine large wigs then worn.

    A selection from Francis Grose’s “Dictionary Of The Vulgar Tongue” (1785)

    --
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    GIF
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  • Helen50 , to bookstodon group
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    This got rather complicated at times, with an extensive cast of characters and a very eccentric house at it's core. Campion wasn't going to get involved in this one, but there comes a time when it's clear that fate wants you to take a hand and when 3 separate ties pull him in, well he gives in and gets involved.
    It's a complicated plot, involving smuggling things in coffins, amongst otherthings. It was enjoyable enough and the end slid to a speedy conclusion. @bookstodon

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    Break 'Em Up: Recovering Our Freedom From Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money by Zephyr Teachout, 2020

    "[We need] a grassroots, bottom-up movement that understands the challenge in front of us, and then organizes against monopoly power in communities across this country. This book is a blueprint for that organizing."
    ―From the foreword by Bernie Sanders.

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    Brief review of "Human Mourning" by José Revueltas

    Winner of Mexico's National Prize for Literature (1943) and based loosely on Revueltas's time in Anáhuac, Nuevo León, where he was sent by the Mexican Communist Party to organize a strike among irrigation system workers (and for which he was sentenced to ten months of forced labor on the Islas Marías penal colony), this text is flawed but incredible. Stirring contemplations on the meaning of death, life, faith, revolution, and Mexico. The prose is immensely powerful, line after line took my breath away. I wish I didn't get this book from the library, I'd have underlined much of it.

    While at times the narration is choppy, incomplete, and shifting, part of the reward is the challenge of reading it. On occasion appalling, violent, and crude, other moments are sublime and beautiful. If you're able to get your hands on a copy, I highly recommend it.

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