appassionato , to bookstodon
@appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

The Girl Who Touched the Stars A True Story of Adventure, Resilience and 254 Days on Perilous Seas by Bonnie Hancock

"It took an ocean to learn it's not how fast you paddle but how deep inside you dig."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-08-28/bonnie-hancock-paddle-surf-ski-around-australia-world-record/101379122

@bookstodon








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  • Linux_Is_Best , (edited ) to random
    @Linux_Is_Best@mstdn.social avatar

    Real talk...

    90% of the time, I can eat shrimp and be just fine. It is that 10% of the time, that I feel an itchy feeling or a small swelling in my throat. It passes on its own and life goes on.

    The theory is that it is not the shrimp I have an issue with, but the plankton (or something) that the shrimp in some parts of the world consume. That's why I can mostly eat it and be just fine.

    I got a set of Epi Pens (Epinephrine), just in case.

    But it has always been ever shrimp.

    1 of 4

    Linux_Is_Best OP ,
    @Linux_Is_Best@mstdn.social avatar

    In America, it is possible to get a job with great healthcare and good benefits, but still be fearful to use them.

    Is it like this elsewhere, or this mostly an American thing?

    kris_inwood , to demography
    @kris_inwood@mas.to avatar

    Historical evidence of disease, fertility decline, violence & resource loss inform a back-cast prediction of high pre-contact Indigenous population in Tasmania & subsequent fast decline, according to a new paper by Byard & Maxwell-Stewart
    https://doi.org/10.1111/aehr.12282

    @economics @demography @socialscience @sociology @politicalscience @geography @anthropology @econhist @devecon @archaeodons @epidemiology

    kris_inwood , to demography
    @kris_inwood@mas.to avatar

    Boyd Hunter reviews details & significance of Butlin’s back-casting of Indigenous population estimates for Australia, points to impact of disease & frontier violence, & confirms Indigenous outnumbered colonists until well into the 1840s. OA in Asia-Pacific Economic History Review
    https://doi.org/10.1111/aehr.12279
    @economics @demography @socialscience @sociology @politicalscience @geography @anthropology @econhist @devecon @epidemiology @archaeodons

    kris_inwood , to demography
    @kris_inwood@mas.to avatar

    Mark Finnane & Jonathan Richards revisit violence against Indigenous people on the Queensland frontier, question recent high mortality estimates & encourage more detailed local studies of colonisation's impact on First Peoples. Open access in @APEHR
    https://doi.org/10.1111/aehr.12278
    @economics @demography @socialscience @sociology @politicalscience @geography @anthropology @econhist @devecon @archaeodons

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History January 31, 1912: A General Strike began in Brisbane, Australia. It lasted until March 6. The strike was a response to the suspension of tramway workers for wearing union badges. Within a few days, the strike committee became the de facto government of Brisbane. No work could be done in the city without the committee’s permission. They created their own independent police force and provided ambulance service for the city. They issued strike coupons, redeemable at stores that were in solidarity with the strikers. People wore red ribbons to show their support and even put them on their dogs and dray horses. On the second day of the strike, 25,000 people marched, with another 50,000 supporters watching. On Black Friday, February 2, the cops attacked a women’s march with batons. Emma Miller, a trade unionist and suffragist who was in her 70s and weighed less than 80 pounds, pulled out a hat pin and stabbed the rump of the police commissioner’s horse. The horse reared and threw the commissioner. As a result of his injury, he limped for the rest of his life. The courts ultimately ruled in favor of the unionists, and their right to wear union badges while on the job. Errol O’Neill wrote a play about the strike, “Faces in the Street.”

    @bookstadon

    MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History January 26, 1808: Soldiers took over New South Wales, Australia, during the Rum Rebellion. It was Australia’s only military coup. At the time, NSW was a British penal colony. William Bligh was governor of the territory. This was the same William Bligh who was an officer under Captain Cook when he attempted to kidnap the King of Hawai’i. He was also the same William Bligh who was overthrown in the Mutiny on the Bounty, in 1789. It is questionable why the British thought he’d do better in charge of a bunch of prisoners and unruly soldiers, than he did with a bunch of sailors. Perhaps they were just desperate. One of Bligh’s commissions was to reign in the Rum Corps, which held a monopoly on the illegal rum trade in Australia. They also controlled the sale of other commodities. Bligh started to enforce penalties for the illegal sale and importation of liquor. He also tried to provide relief to farmers, suffering from recent flooding and price-gouging by the Rum Corps, by providing provisions from the colony’s stores. The monopolists didn’t like his looting of the stores, from which they were profiting handsomely, nor his enforcement of the liquor laws. So, they arrested him and deported him to Hobart, Van Diemen’s Land. The military remained in control of NSW until 1810.

    @bookstadon

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  • dimi , to humour
    @dimi@techforgood.social avatar
    petersuber , to academicchatter
    @petersuber@fediscience.org avatar

    Strong argument that in should adopt policies.
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0067205X231213676

    "Without the right to use their own content, universities are hostage to the decisions of publishers…With those rights, universities, and researchers, become the players they should be: with an active role in determining the future of research dissemination and hence promoting the dissemination of knowledge."


    @academicchatter
    @openscience

    KatKimbriel , to bookstodon
    @KatKimbriel@raggedfeathers.com avatar

    "Call me when the Cross turns over," old-time Australian drovers would say, "or when the Pointers are clear."

    New from Sylvia Kelso & Book View Cafe--WHERE THE CROSS TURNS OVER, a collection of stories based in Australia.

    Stories to remind you that the Outback specializes in Weird.
    @bookstodon

    https://bookviewcafe.com/bvc-announces-where-the-cross-turns-over-by-sylvia-kelso/

    sylvianana , to random
    @sylvianana@mastodon.world avatar

    Plea. Name the species and give its approximate location. It adds so much to a posting of a bird photograph. Bye the way - scientific name is a bonus

    Taken early October 2023

    Bar-shouldered Dove (Geopelia humeralis)

    There is some gorgeous looking doves in Australia

    Bar-shouldered Dove (Geopelia humeralis)
    Bar-shouldered Dove (Geopelia humeralis)

    the_bookwolf , to bookstodon

    Hi.

    I posted about a book club event for people living in Queensland here on mastodon. I can now confirm the details of the event, since I got a venue today.
    When: Saturday, January 27 from 10:30AM-12:00pm.
    Where: Brisbane Square Library.
    We'll be chatting about all things books, but we won't have a set book for the month because everyone reads at different speeds and enjoys different books. We've got space for about 20 people, so if you are coming or would like to come, please let me know. There's a facebook event which I can also link to, if anyone would like it.

    @bookstodon

    appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    Our State of Mind

    In 1937, the Australian Government adopted a policy that led to the removal of Aboriginal children from their families. The aim was assimilation. The result, if the policy had continued, would have been the end of the Aboriginal race. The terrible long term impact on the mental, physical and emotional health of those children, now known as the Stolen Generation, is well documented. But how could such a policy have been passed?

    @bookstodon

    appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    Landscape, Association, Empire: Imagining Van Diemen’s Land

    This book tells a compelling story about invasion, settler colonialism, and an emergent sense of identity in place, as seen through topographical and landscape images by seven fascinating artists.

    @bookstodon





    appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    Shooting the Picture Press Photography in Australia

    Shooting The Picture is the story of Australian press photography from 1888 to today—the power of the medium, seismic changes in the newspaper industry, and photographers who were often more colourful than their subjects.

    @bookstodon



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  • appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    Fighting Hard: The Victorian Aborigines Advancement League

    Fighting Hard tells a history of the Aborigines Advancement League, the oldest Aboriginal organization in Australia. As both a welfare and activist body, the League can be seen as the mother of all Aboriginal Victorian community organizations, having spawned a diverse range of organizations.

    @bookstodon






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  • kris_inwood , to economics
    @kris_inwood@mas.to avatar

    Program & registration is now available for Asia-Pacific Economic & Business History Conference 16-18 Feb 2024 in Honolulu. 36 exciting papers inc 8 Chinese & 8 Australian economic history. Plenary speaker Zhiwu Chen (HKU). Host is the wonderful Sumner La Croix.
    https://sites.google.com/hawaii.edu/2024apebhconference/home
    @economics @demography @socialscience @sociology @politicalscience @geography @anthropology @econhist @devecon

    kris_inwood , to economics
    @kris_inwood@mas.to avatar

    Just published in the Asia-Pacific Econ His Rev: age misreporting in military sources, the social determinants of patenting in NZ, innovation & growth in Australia, structural change in brewing, the long-term impact of treaty ports & a thoughtful obituary for Gus Sinclair
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/2832157x/2023/63/3
    @APEHR @economics @demography @socialscience @sociology @politicalscience @geography @sts @anthropology @econhist @devecon

    appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    Investigative journalist Antony Loewenstein has won an award for his book on Israel’s military-industrial complex.

    The book The Palestine Laboratory: How Israel Exports the Technology of Occupation Around the World examines how the occupied Palestinian territories are used by Israel as a testing ground for new weapons.

    He won the book category at The Walkley Awards, Australia’s biggest journalism awards.

    @bookstodon
    @palestine



    kcfromaustcrime , to bookstodon
    @kcfromaustcrime@mastodon.online avatar

    Review of Suburban True Crime by Emily Webb just posted at:

    https://www.austcrimefiction.org/review/suburban-true-crime-emily-webb

    The collection of cases covered by Emily Webb's SUBURBAN TRUE CRIME go back to the 1940's, through to more recent times, covering a wide range of different murders and disappearances that have occurred in Australian suburban locations.






    @bookstodon

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  • radlschorsch , to random German
    @radlschorsch@muenchen.social avatar

    Wo bleiben die Universitäten im Fediverse?

    Warum betreiben Universitäten nicht schon längst eigene Mastodon-Instanzen?

    Warum bekommen Studierende nicht mit der Immatrikulation auch einen Mastodon-Handle?

    Warum hosten Universitäten Vorlesungsvideos nicht über PeerTube im Fediverse?

    Es gibt einiges, das für ein stärkeres Engagement von Universitäten im Fediverse spricht.

    Ein Aufruf den man nur unterstützen kann!

    https://netzpolitik.org/2023/aufruf-hochschulen-aller-laender-ins-fediverse/

    dsfgs ,
    @dsfgs@mastodon.sdf.org avatar

    @bensb @srfirehorseart @radlschorsch @academicchatter @edutooters
    Where are universities on a whole host of things, including furthering the availability of free-license and open-source software which they seem to be doing less and less.

    We think universities are well placed to also provide I2P nodes and nodes for other federated systems.

    To us it seems that universities have largely been , in they act more as real-estate developers regrettably.

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  • MikeDunnAuthor , to bookstadon
    @MikeDunnAuthor@kolektiva.social avatar

    Today in Labor History November 4, 1839: The Newport Rising began. It was the last large-scale armed rebellion against authority in mainland Britain. It began when approximately 4,000 Chartists, led by John Frost, marched on the town of Newport. When several were arrested, other Chartists, including coal miners, many armed with homemade weapons, marched on the Westgate Hotel (where they were held) to liberate them. Up to 24 were killed when soldiers were ordered to open fire on them. The Chartists were fighting for the adoption of the People’s Charter, which called for universal suffrage, the secret ballot, and the right of regular working people to serve in the House of Commons. Three leaders of the uprising were sentenced to death, but popular protests got their sentences commuted to Transportation for Life, probably to Australia or Van Dieman’s Land (Tasmania). America’s first cop, Allan Pinkerton, supposedly participated in this rebellion. He was a known Chartist in those days, a physical force man who loved to battle cops and Tory thugs. Because of his history of street violence and vandalism, he had to flee Britain in the dark of the night, ultimately settling in Illinois, where he eventually set up the private detective agency that would go on to murder numerous union organizers, and set up hundreds more for long prison stints through the use of agents provocateur and perjured testimonies.

    The riots were depicted in the following novels: “Sir Cosmo Digby,” by James Augustus St John (1843), “Rape of the Fair Country,” by Alexander Cordell (1959) and “Children of Rebecca,” by Vivien Annis Bailey (1995).

    @bookstadon

    NarrelleMHarris , to bookstodon
    @NarrelleMHarris@mas.to avatar

    The Diemen Alexander by Marie Hietz has just been released! Set in Hobart, it's SF featuring zoology, comparative anatomy and venture capitalism. It also explores the ethics of human responsibility towards animals, the earth and each other, and the truth that power goes to the person most prepared to wield it.

    Described as "Jurassic Park meets ET - in the best possible way.’

    https://www.clandestinepress.net/products/the-diemen-alexander

    @bookstodon

    kcfromaustcrime , to bookstodon
    @kcfromaustcrime@mastodon.online avatar

    Recently finished reading Flawed Hero by Chris Masters - the story behind the case against Ben Roberts-Smith VC. This is one of two books on the recent defamation trial bought by BRS against various parties including Masters, and fellow journalist Nick McKenzie (his book on the same case is Crossing the Line).

    https://bookwyrm.social/book/1432873/s/flawed-hero





    @bookstodon

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  • estelle , to random
    @estelle@techhub.social avatar

    Published in January 2023: "Trends in racial and ethnic discrimination in in six countries": https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2212875120


    Here below are graphs of discrimination ratios over time by racialized group. The shaded area is 95% confidence region. You may notice that has been stable since the except for a rise against MENA-passing persons since 1990.

    Speeches matter: Colin Powell’s presentation at the UN Security Council didn’t directly lead to the invasion but feeded : https://www.npr.org/2023/02/03/1151160567/colin-powell-iraq-un-weapons-mass-destruction

    estelle ,
    @estelle@infosec.exchange avatar

    Dr. Randa Abdel-Fattah: "Countering violent extremism, governmentality and Australian Muslim youth as ‘becoming terrorist’"

    Abstract
    This article explores how a ‘regime of truth’ about Muslim youth has been historically produced through the underlying logic of Australia’s counter-terrorism and countering violent extremism (CVE) policies and practices. The article is divided into three parts. I first look at how the pre-emptive logic of countering the ‘becoming terrorist’ constitutes young Australian Muslims. I then interrogate the way CVE has constituted Australian Muslims as a self-contained space, a governmental population divided between ‘moderates’ and ‘extremists’. Lastly, I discuss how CVE operates as a technique of governmentality in the way that it deploys grants programs to foster the ‘conduct of conduct’ of Muslim subjects within this self-contained racialised space. I argue that the central organising logic of community partnership has been the targeting of the conditions of emergence of ‘extremist’ Muslim subjects, thereby guaranteeing the racialisation of Muslim youth as always at-risk, marked with the ‘potential’ of ‘becoming terrorist’.

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1440783319842666 @sociology

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