IHChistory , to histodons
@IHChistory@masto.pt avatar

On 18 March, we will welcome researcher Patricia López-Gay (Bard College) for a lecture dedicated to the life and work of , a Spanish political activist, public intellectual and writer.

Admission is free and no registration is needed.

https://ihc.fcsh.unl.pt/en/events/20th-century-history-when-lecriture/

@histodons
@litstudies

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  • scotlit , to random
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    Haste Ye Back (again)
    5 March, Glasgow University & online
    Free

    Dorothy K. Haynes (1918–1987) was a well-known author of horror fiction. Dr Craig Lamont discusses editing HASTE YE BACK, Haynes’s of her childhood years in Aberlour Orphanage. An orphanage, in north-east Scotland, during the Great Depression, sounds like the setting for something grim – yet Haynes shows how an orphanage can also be a home, & a happy one too.

    https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/haste-ye-back-again-editing-the-memoir-of-dorothy-k-haynes-tickets-807753130357

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    🚨Available for preorder – coming March 2024🚨

    HASTE YE BACK
    by Dorothy K. Haynes
    edited by Craig Lamont

    A gifted writer of & fiction, Dorothy K. Haynes (1918–1987) grew up in Aberlour Orphanage. In this memoir, she brings to life the residents & stories of the institution that shaped her

    @bookstodon

    https://asls.org.uk/publications/books/volumes/haste-ye-back/

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  • scotlit , to random
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    James Leslie Mitchell (1901–1935), better known as Lewis Grassic Gibbon, was born , 13 Feb. Author of SUNSET SONG – & many other titles from to – he is one of the most important writers of the

    A 🎂🧵…

    1/9

    https://digital.nls.uk/learning/sunset-song-quines/overview-of-the-novel/biography-of-lewis-grassic-gibbon/

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    “The ambiguity of authority & reliability in narration, in Scots or English, is central to Hogg, Galt, Stevenson, many others, but in Gibbon’s trilogy it is utterly deconstructed”

    —Alan Riach: the influence of Gibbon on contemporary

    2/9

    https://www.thenational.scot/news/15550316.lewis-grassic-gibbon-uncovering-the-morning-star/

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    “Not only did he invent a sentence structure that works like breath through the body of the reader, and a kind of Scottish English that’s simultaneously rich and spare, but [A Scots Quair is] a formally stunning and cunning work of art”

    —Ali Smith, on James Leslie Mitchell / Lewis Grassic Gibbon

    3/9

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jun/29/ali-smith-books-that-made-me

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    SUNSET SONG: a Scottish Gift to German Readers

    Regina Erich compares the original of Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s A SCOTS QUAIR trilogy published in the between 1970 & 1986, with its more recent republication in a unified Germany

    4/9

    https://www.thebottleimp.org.uk/2019/12/sunset-song-a-scottish-gift-to-german-readers/

    IHChistory , to histodons
    @IHChistory@masto.pt avatar

    📖 As a result of his doctoral research at the IHC, Diogo Duarte has published an article on , and in Portugal in the first half of the 20th century.

    👉 Read it in the Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies: https://doi.org/10.1080/14701847.2023.2282830

    @histodons

    scotlit , to bookstodon
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    THAT PROMETHEAN SPARK
    THE BOTTLE IMP – Muriel Spark Special Issue

    “With a writing career that included biography, criticism, drama and short fiction as well as novels, Muriel Spark was never one to do things by halves…”

    Muriel Spark was born , 1 Feb, 1918. A 🎂🧵 …

    @bookstodon

    Literature

    1/9

    https://www.thebottleimp.org.uk/issues/issue-22/

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  • scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @bookstodon
    “I advocate the arts of satire and of ridicule. And I see no other living art form for the future. Ridicule is the only honourable weapon we have left.”

    —available on BBC Sounds: Alan Taylor & William Boyd join Mariella Frostrup to share their love of Muriel Spark’s writing

    2/9
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09lxpyg

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @bookstodon
    “Spark had just passed on to me an unexpected gift: the gift of the future. I’m beginning to think her books are themselves a kind of fruitfulness.”

    —Ali Smith on how Muriel Spark gives us the gift of the future

    3/9
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jan/29/ali-smith-on-muriel-spark-at-100

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @bookstodon
    “As far-right ideas spread, and misinformation abounds, her books are a piercing reminder of how extreme politics can appeal to the sanest-seeming people—and that half-truths and malfeasance are as intrinsic to human nature as breathing. Spark is a bard of nastiness and lies.”

    —The Economist on the continuing relevance of Muriel Spark’s fiction

    4/9
    https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2018/07/19/muriel-spark-is-a-bard-of-nastiness-and-lies

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @bookstodon
    “Muriel Spark gave me a new model for a feminist hero […] It was about loitering—about the quiet subversiveness of simply existing in public as a woman.”

    —Beth Jellicoe on Muriel Spark’s LOITERING WITH INTENT

    5/9
    https://electricliterature.com/sometimes-the-most-feminist-thing-you-can-do-is-exist-as-a-woman-in-public/

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @bookstodon
    “What hash Spark’s characters make of those eternal debates over unlikable characters or unlikable women. These women aren’t unlikable, these women are monstrous… Spark looks at her women like a wolf.”

    —Parul Sehgal in the New Yorker

    6/9
    https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/what-muriel-spark-saw

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @bookstodon
    AFTERWORDS: Muriel Spark
    “One’s prime is elusive…”

    —On BBC Sounds: writers Ian Rankin & Zoë Strachan discuss Muriel Spark’s life & work with National Library of Scotland curator Colin McIlroy, & Spark’s friend & memoirist, Alan Taylor

    7/9
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0018238

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @bookstodon
    “It is a good thing to go to Paris for a few days if you have had a lot of trouble, and that is my advice to everyone except Parisians.”

    —extracts from A GOOD COMB, by Muriel Spark, ed. Penelope Jardine, via Literary Hub

    8/9
    https://lithub.com/a-few-words-of-indispensible-advice-from-muriel-spark/

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    @litstudies
    THE CROOKED DIVIDEND
    Essays on Muriel Spark
    ed. Gerard Carruthers & Helen Stoddart

    Muriel Spark in British culture, the influence of Scottish literary traditions on her work, how she explores gender, religion, politics, & more

    Also online via Project MUSE

    9/9

    https://asls.org.uk/publications/books/occasional_papers/the-crooked-dividend/

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    scotlit , to random
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    George Douglas Brown (1869–1902) was born , 26 Jan—best known for his 1901 novel THE HOUSE WITH THE GREEN SHUTTERS

    “…the TRAINSPOTTING of its day… an angry young man’s response to the misrepresentation of contemporary Scottish life”

    🎂🧵
    1/4

    https://list.co.uk/news/39535/george-douglas-brown-the-house-with-the-green-shutters-1901

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    “I remember the first novel in English I read through was a Scottish novel called The House with the Green Shutters. […] When I read that, I wanted to be Scotch.”

    —Jorge Luis Borges, interviewed by the Paris Review in July 1966

    2/4

    https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/4331/the-art-of-fiction-no-39-jorge-luis-borges

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    “To pick up a pen is to place oneself outside the community in the act of being self-conscious about it. As Burns discovered, it is not really possible to write about community and remain uncompromised within it.”

    —read Dorothy McMillan’s essay “Rural Realism”, on George Douglas Brown’s THE HOUSE WITH THE GREEN SHUTTERS

    3/4

    https://www.thebottleimp.org.uk/2022/05/rural-realism/

    scotlit OP ,
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    Location & dis-location in George Douglas Brown’s THE HOUSE WITH THE GREEN SHUTTERS

    Benjamine Toussaint, Études anglaises 70/4, 2017

    @litstudies

    4/4

    https://www.cairn-int.info/article.php?ID_ARTICLE=E_ETAN_704_0429

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  • appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    In 1926: Living at the Edge of Time

    Travel back to the year 1926 and into the rush of experiences that made people feel they were living on the edge of time. Touch a world where speed seemed the very essence of life.

    @bookstodon





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  • appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    MusicQuake: The Most Disruptive Moments in Music

    MusicQuake tells the stories of 50 pivotal albums and performances that shook the world of modern music – chronicling the fascinating tales of their creation, reception and legacy. Tracing enigmatic composers, risqué performers and radical songwriters – this books introduces the history of 20th century music in a new light.

    @bookstodon

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  • scotlit , to bookstodon
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    “Farewell Miss Julie Logan: A Wintry Tale”, by J.M. Barrie

    Written in diary form & telling of an uncanny romance in a remote winter glen, “Farewell Miss Julie Logan” evokes J.M. Barrie’s fascination with longing, death & loss in one of the most unnerving & tenacious examples of fiction ever to come from

    Listen to the story online, courtesy of Romancing the Gothic:

    @bookstodon

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enjQUoqUpy4

    scotlit , to litstudies
    @scotlit@mastodon.scot avatar

    Characterization & symbolism in Neil Gunn’s three historical novels

    12 Dec, 5–6:30pm GMT/6–7:30 CET, free online

    This talk will examine three historical novels by Neil M. Gunn (1891–1973), depicting Scottish communities at a time of transition: Sun Circle, Butcher’s Broom, & The Silver Darlings

    @litstudies

    https://www.scotland.uni-mainz.de/reading-scotland/

    appassionato , to bookstodon
    @appassionato@mastodon.social avatar

    Love in a Time of Hate: Art and Passion in the Shadow of War

    “An enthralling and insightful cultural history—one that shows how, over the course of one pivotal decade, love, freedom and the freedom to love gave way to fear, madness and despair.” —Malcolm Forbes, Washington Post Book Review
    An ingeniously orchestrated popular history brings to life the most pivotal decade of the twentieth century.

    @bookstodon






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